Recent News https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/ Recent News for UC Davis Leadership en Checking In With Chancellor May: A Way Forward https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/checking-in-with-chancellor-may-a-way-forward <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Checking In With Chancellor May: A Way Forward</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 29, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/chancellor-gary-s-may-writing-desk_7.jpg?h=0231508f&amp;itok=S94Q72GB" width="1280" height="720" alt="Chancellor May sitting at desk writing a letter" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description="To the UC Davis Community: This week has been one of optimism: Yolo County lifted its shelter-in-place order yesterday and is starting to reopen; our research enterprise continues to ramp back up, moving into Phase 2; and we laid out our guiding principles for how we will gradually restart other campus operations. But it has also been a terribly difficult week in a way that has nothing to do with the coronavirus: the injustice that we saw in Minneapolis. At the end of today’s message, I have provided links to a joint statement by our campus police chief and the Davis police chief, and my own statement. I’ll try to lighten the emotional load by proudly sharing information about some of our health care heroes, the start of our celebrations for the Class of 2020, and the virtual Arts &amp; Humanities Graduate Exhibition that opened last night. Thank you for your attention, for all of your messages this week, and for your continued resilience. As Vice Chancellor Kelly Ratliff emphasized in her message to the campus yesterday, we will proceed carefully and deliberately in transitioning back to regular campus operations. We began planning for this weeks ago, and it has never been our intention to simply flip the switch from “suspended operations” to “open for business.” There are guidelines we will follow for the health and safety of our community. Vice Chancellor Ratliff said it, and I’ve said it, but it bears repeating. We must be patient. Under the guiding principles we have established, administrative and office work should ramp up in alignment with workload drivers that trigger the need for on-campus personnel; activities that can be conducted remotely should continue in remote mode to the fullest extent possible as determined and assigned by supervisors and managers; and reasonable accommodations should be assessed and implemented using an interactive process and should consider individual COVID-19 risk status and related factors such as child care to the extent allowed by law. On the research front, Vice Chancellor Prasant Mohapatra announced today we are moving to Phase 2 in our ramp-up plan, effective Monday (June 1), allowing time-sensitive research activities (but with a maximum of approximately one-third of research personnel on-site at any time). All ongoing efforts approved for Phases 1 and 1x can choose to move to Phase 2 gradually and cautiously. As planned, there is very little change from Phase 1x to Phase 2; no further approval is required unless mandated by unit chairs/deans/directors. Restarting of new efforts will have to be coordinated with the chairs/deans/directors, following the process that was defined for Phase 1x. One more administrative announcement: Carolyn Thomas, vice provost and dean for Undergraduate Education, has been named the new provost and vice president of Academic Affairs at her alma mater, California State University, Fullerton. She has been a champion of first-generation, underrepresented and low-income students, and we will miss her engaged leadership. Read today’s announcement. Summer and fall We have decided to offer all Summer Sessions courses remotely across Sessions I and II, and we continue to communicate about instruction in fall quarter. Two letters went out yesterday, one from Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph J. Hexter to our continuing undergraduates, and the other from Provost Hexter and Academic Senate Chair Kristin Lagattuta to Academic Senate members. Currently being developed are messages for graduate and professional students as well as for other instructional staff. The letters sent yesterday mentioned the careful planning underway and the coordination with public health authorities that will enable us to resume many activities on campus this fall, including offering a significant number of in-person courses. Since the parameters for in-person gatherings are not yet finalized — and might of course shift if the virus itself resurges — we are still working to determine which courses will be either solely in person or have an in-person option. If undergraduate students are unable or decide not to be on campus this fall, for whatever reason, UC Davis is prepared to offer them remote courses so they can continue to make degree progress. Leadership will provide greater specificity over the coming weeks on instructional plans for fall. Spring quarter winds down But first things first: We still have spring quarter to finish —  one more week of classes, then finals. Please note that Shields Library will provide limited additional study space (beyond the 50 seats already available in the 24-Hour Study Room). The extra space, in and near the Main Reading Room, will be open from noon to 8 p.m. June 5-11. Please wear face coverings — this order is still in effect for all of Yolo County. Just as we assess students’ work, we are asking students to help us learn from your experiences with remote instruction in spring quarter. Did a professor do something in your class that really made remote learning work well for you? Were you able to access counseling and accommodations services? Did remote learning affect your sense of connection to UC Davis? The Center for Educational Effectiveness has launched the End-of-Quarter Remote Learning Survey to inform and improve future remote instructional experiences. Respond by June 5 for a chance to win a $25 Amazon gift card. More information and the link to the survey. Grading policies The Davis Division of the Academic Senate recognizes the stresses that students and instructors are facing in their academic and personal lives during the pandemic. To reduce academic uncertainty and increase flexibility when trying to adapt to remote instruction, the senate and administrative partners announced the following updates to Passed/Not Passed (P/NP) grading policies for undergraduates: Spring 2020 — The deadline for undergraduate students to opt for P/NP grading in a course, or revert back to letter grading, is June 4 (see student FAQ). Summer Sessions 2020 — Deadlines have been extended to opt for P/NP grading in a course or to revert back to letter grading (July 24 for Summer Session I and Sept. 4 for Summer Session II). As with spring 2020, Summer Sessions P/NP units are exempt from the one-third maximum rule (P/NP units can account for no more than one-third of the units a student takes for graduation at UC Davis). These amendments do not override additional college or major limitations on the use of P/NP courses for degree requirements. The Academic Senate notes that P/NP usage can be complex. Students should consider potential consequences related to satisfactory academic progress, time to degree, financial aid and postgraduate study requirements. Students with questions should consult their advisors about P/NP usage. This online FAQ provides further information. The Class of 2020 We could not be prouder of all of our students for making it through the trials and tribulations of spring quarter — especially our graduates, who, besides everything else going on, did not have quite the final year of college they had hoped for, not even traditional commencement. This is a special class, indeed, and we’re inviting fellow students, family members, faculty and staff to send congratulatory messages by posting them online with the hashtag #DearUCDavisGrad or via this website. We’re posting your messages, photos and videos on our commencement website. All of the messages I have seen so far validate what I’ve always said: This is my favorite time of the year! We are seeing abundant joy in the remote celebrations we are holding, and we look forward to setting a date for in-person commencement in the fall. The School of Veterinary Medicine held its online program last Friday afternoon, but also managed to throw in an in-person event earlier in the day, inviting the graduates to drive through the parking lot where each received a very special box — their diploma was inside. Nice!         This morning, I spoke at the School of Medicine’s virtual graduation, which included “lots of pomp, amid unusual circumstances,” as Edwin Garcia wrote in a news release. Congratulations to our newest medical doctors and our newest veterinary doctors, as well as our law school graduates who went first, May 16, and elected to not have a virtual ceremony. Heroes and backup masks All of this is taking place in the shadow of the coronavirus and COVID-19. We have health care personnel on the front lines and researchers engaged in the global effort against the virus. Some of our health care heroes took vacation time or leave to help in the United States’ COVID-19 epicenter: New York City, making them superheroes. One of them, Paula Wagner, a nurse practitioner in outpatient urology, returned May 18 after 13 days at Coney Island Hospital in Brooklyn. She worked 12-hour shifts like everyone else, and reported: “What was most surprising for me was the lack of essential equipment.” UC Davis Medical Center is fortunate to have never run out of supplies, and is taking steps to be extra prepared with a stock of backup N95 respirator masks. They are used masks that we are decontaminating with vaporized hydrogen peroxide. We know the process is safe, as other industries have successfully used it to sterilize other kinds of equipment. Before we reuse our masks, though, we are doing fit-testing to assess their integrity and performance after decontamination. Staff, faculty and students are invited to volunteer to help with the testing. It started this week on the Davis campus, and there are 12 more testing days on the Sacramento campus, June 2-19. Learn more about the project (including how to volunteer). Other announcements The Arts &amp; Humanities Graduate Exhibition, which opened last night, virtually, can be viewed through June 14 on the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art’s website. For Your Information, the monthly newsletter from the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, came out yesterday, and it includes Vice Chancellor Renetta Tull Garrison’s comments on what we might be able to do “post-COVID” that will be better than the ways that we conducted business before the pandemic and the shelter-in-place directives. See the newsletter here. Safety Month is every month, really, but, for June we have organized special activities connected to weekly themes: rest, resilience and well-being; ergonomics tips when working from home; wildfire preparedness; and managing chemical inventory. Learn more here. Safety Month starts Monday with an invitation to join the Rest and Revive Kickoff event, noon to 1 p.m. Rest and Revive is a six-week email campaign presented by the Staff and Faculty Health and Well-Being Program; learn more and register here. Remembering George Floyd Finally today, I want to commend UC Davis Police Chief Joe Farrow and city of Davis Police Chief Darren Pytel for their joint statement on the tragedy of George Floyd’s death in Minnesota. And here’s a link to my statement. Sincerely, Gary S. May Chancellor "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>To the UC Davis Community:</strong></p> <p>This week has been one of optimism: <a href="https://www.yolocounty.org/health-human-services/adults/communicable-disease-investigation-and-control/novel-coronavirus-2019/roadmap-to-recovery">Yolo County lifted its shelter-in-place order yesterday</a> and is starting to reopen; our research enterprise continues to ramp back up, moving into Phase 2; and we laid out our guiding principles for how we will gradually restart other campus operations.</p> <p>But it has also been a terribly difficult week in a way that has nothing to do with the coronavirus: the injustice that we saw in Minneapolis. At the end of today’s message, I have provided links to a joint statement by our campus police chief and the Davis police chief, and my own statement.</p> <p>I’ll try to lighten the emotional load by proudly sharing information about some of our health care heroes, the start of our celebrations for the Class of 2020, and the virtual Arts &amp; Humanities Graduate Exhibition that opened last night. Thank you for your attention, for all of your messages this week, and for your continued resilience.</p> <p>As Vice Chancellor Kelly Ratliff emphasized in her <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/davis-campus-readies-gradually-reinstate-reduced-operations">message to the campus</a> yesterday, we will proceed carefully and deliberately in transitioning back to regular campus operations. We began planning for this weeks ago, and it has never been our intention to simply flip the switch from “suspended operations” to “open for business.” There are guidelines we will follow for the health and safety of our community.</p> <p>Vice Chancellor Ratliff said it, and I’ve said it, but it bears repeating. We must be patient. Under the guiding principles we have established, <strong>a</strong><strong>dministrative and office work </strong>should ramp up in alignment with workload drivers that trigger the need for on-campus personnel; <strong>activities that can be conducted remotely</strong> should continue in remote mode to the fullest extent possible as determined and assigned by supervisors and managers; and <strong>reasonable accommodations</strong> should be assessed and implemented using an interactive process and should consider individual COVID-19 risk status and related factors such as child care to the extent allowed by law.</p> <p>On the research front, Vice Chancellor Prasant Mohapatra announced today we are moving to Phase 2 in our <a href="https://research.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/UCDavis_Research_RampUp_Plan.pdf">ramp-up plan</a>, effective Monday (June 1), allowing time-sensitive research activities (but with a maximum of approximately one-third of research personnel on-site at any time).</p> <p>All ongoing efforts approved for Phases 1 and 1x can choose to move to Phase 2 gradually and cautiously. As planned, there is very little change from Phase 1x to Phase 2; no further approval is required unless mandated by unit chairs/deans/directors. Restarting of new efforts will have to be coordinated with the chairs/deans/directors, following the process that was defined for Phase 1x.</p> <p>One more administrative announcement: Carolyn Thomas, vice provost and dean for Undergraduate Education, has been named the new provost and vice president of Academic Affairs at her alma mater, California State University, Fullerton. She has been a champion of first-generation, underrepresented and low-income students, and we will miss her engaged leadership. <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/thomas-appointed-provost-cal-state-fullerton">Read today’s announcement.</a></p> <h2><strong>Summer and fall</strong></h2> <p>We have decided to offer all Summer Sessions courses remotely across Sessions I and II, and we continue to communicate about instruction in fall quarter. Two letters went out yesterday, one from Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph J. Hexter to our <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/sites/default/files/news/campus-news/2020/may/message-to-continuing-undergraduates-20200528.pdf">continuing undergraduates</a>, and the other from Provost Hexter and Academic Senate Chair Kristin Lagattuta to <a href="https://academicsenate.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk3876/files/inline-files/final_fall_web_5.28.20.pdf">Academic Senate members</a>. Currently being developed are messages for graduate and professional students as well as for other instructional staff.<br /><br /> The letters sent yesterday mentioned the careful planning underway and the coordination with public health authorities that will enable us to resume many activities on campus this fall, including offering a significant number of in-person courses. Since the parameters for in-person gatherings are not yet finalized — and might of course shift if the virus itself resurges — we are still working to determine which courses will be either solely in person or have an in-person option. If undergraduate students are unable or decide not to be on campus this fall, for whatever reason, UC Davis is prepared to offer them remote courses so they can continue to make degree progress.<br /><br /> Leadership will provide greater specificity over the coming weeks on instructional plans for fall.</p> <h2><strong>Spring quarter winds down</strong></h2> <p>But first things first: We still have spring quarter to finish —  one more week of classes, then finals. Please note that <a href="https://www.library.ucdavis.edu/news/limited-additional-study-space-for-finals/">Shields Library will provide limited additional study space</a> (beyond the 50 seats already available in the 24-Hour Study Room). The extra space, in and near the Main Reading Room, will be open from noon to 8 p.m. June 5-11. Please wear face coverings — this order is still in effect for all of Yolo County.</p> <p>Just as we assess students’ work, we are asking students to help us learn from your experiences with remote instruction in spring quarter. Did a professor do something in your class that really made remote learning work well for you? Were you able to access counseling and accommodations services? Did remote learning affect your sense of connection to UC Davis?</p> <p>The Center for Educational Effectiveness has launched the End-of-Quarter Remote Learning Survey to inform and improve future remote instructional experiences. Respond by June 5 for a chance to win a $25 Amazon gift card. <a href="https://cee.ucdavis.edu/blog/spring2020-remote-learning-student-survey">More information and the link to the survey.</a></p> <h2><strong>Grading policies</strong></h2> <p>The Davis Division of the Academic Senate recognizes the stresses that students and instructors are facing in their academic and personal lives during the pandemic. To reduce academic uncertainty and increase flexibility when trying to adapt to remote instruction, the senate and administrative partners announced the following updates to Passed/Not Passed (P/NP) grading policies for undergraduates:</p> <ul><li><strong>Spring 2020 —</strong> The deadline for undergraduate students to opt for P/NP grading in a course, or revert back to letter grading, is June 4 (see <a href="https://studentaffairs.ucdavis.edu/news/coronavirus-faqs#advising">student FAQ</a>).</li> <li><strong>Summer Sessions 2020 — Deadlines have been extended </strong>to opt for P/NP grading in a course or to revert back to letter grading (July 24 for Summer Session I and Sept. 4 for Summer Session II). As with spring 2020, <strong>Summer Sessions P/NP units are exempt</strong> from the one-third maximum rule (P/NP units can account for no more than one-third of the units a student takes for graduation at UC Davis). These amendments do not override additional college or major limitations on the use of P/NP courses for degree requirements.</li> </ul><p>The Academic Senate notes that<strong> </strong>P/NP usage can be complex. Students should consider potential consequences related to satisfactory academic progress, time to degree, financial aid and postgraduate study requirements. Students with questions should consult their advisors about P/NP usage. This <a href="https://studentaffairs.ucdavis.edu/news/coronavirus-faqs#pnpoption">online FAQ</a> provides further information.</p> <h2><strong>The Class of 2020</strong></h2> <p>We could not be prouder of all of our students for making it through the trials and tribulations of spring quarter — especially our graduates, who, besides everything else going on, did not have quite the final year of college they had hoped for, not even traditional commencement.</p> <p>This is a special class, indeed, and we’re inviting fellow students, family members, faculty and staff to send congratulatory messages by posting them online with the hashtag #DearUCDavisGrad or via this <a href="https://bit.ly/DearUCDav%C2%ACisGrad">website</a>. We’re posting your messages, photos and videos on our <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/commencement">commencement website</a>.</p> <p>All of the messages I have seen so far validate what I’ve always said: This is my favorite time of the year! We are seeing abundant joy in the remote celebrations we are holding, and we look forward to setting a date for in-person commencement in the fall.</p> <p>The School of Veterinary Medicine held its online program last Friday afternoon, but also managed to throw in an in-person event earlier in the day, inviting the graduates to drive through the parking lot where each received a very special box — their diploma was inside. Nice!        </p> <p>This morning, I spoke at the School of Medicine’s virtual graduation, which included “lots of pomp, amid unusual circumstances,” as Edwin Garcia wrote in a news release.</p> <p>Congratulations to our newest medical doctors and our newest veterinary doctors, as well as our law school graduates who went first, May 16, and elected to not have a virtual ceremony.</p> <h2><strong>Heroes and backup masks</strong></h2> <p>All of this is taking place in the shadow of the coronavirus and COVID-19. We have health care personnel on the front lines and researchers engaged in the global effort against the virus.</p> <p>Some of our health care heroes took vacation time or leave to help in the United States’ COVID-19 epicenter: New York City, making them superheroes. <a href="https://health.ucdavis.edu/health-news/contenthub/volunteering-in-brooklyn-hospital-long-days-short-on-supplies-caring-workers/2020/05">One of them, Paula Wagner, a nurse practitioner in outpatient urology</a>, returned May 18 after 13 days at Coney Island Hospital in Brooklyn. She worked 12-hour shifts like everyone else, and reported: “What was most surprising for me was the lack of essential equipment.”</p> <p>UC Davis Medical Center is fortunate to have never run out of supplies, and is taking steps to be extra prepared with a stock of backup N95 respirator masks. They are used masks that we are decontaminating with vaporized hydrogen peroxide. We know the process is safe, as other industries have successfully used it to sterilize other kinds of equipment.</p> <p>Before we reuse our masks, though, we are doing fit-testing to assess their integrity and performance after decontamination. Staff, faculty and students are invited to volunteer to help with the testing. It started this week on the Davis campus, and there are 12 more testing days on the Sacramento campus, June 2-19.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/volunteers-sought-fit-test-n95-masks">Learn more about the project (including how to volunteer).</a></p> <h2><strong>Other announcements</strong></h2> <ul><li><strong>The </strong><a href="https://lettersandscience.ucdavis.edu/news/show-goes-on"><strong>Arts &amp; Humanities Graduate Exhibition</strong></a>, which opened last night, virtually, can be viewed through June 14 on the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art’s website.</li> <li><strong>For Your Information,</strong> the monthly newsletter from the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, came out yesterday, and it includes Vice Chancellor Renetta Tull Garrison’s comments on what we might be able to do “post-COVID” that will be <strong>better</strong> than the ways that we conducted business before the pandemic and the shelter-in-place directives. <a href="https://diversity.ucdavis.edu/your-information-newsletter">See the newsletter here.</a></li> <li><strong>Safety Month is every month,</strong> really, but, for June we have organized special activities connected to weekly themes: rest, resilience and well-being; ergonomics tips when working from home; wildfire preparedness; and managing chemical inventory. <a href="https://safetyservices.ucdavis.edu/safetymonth">Learn more here.</a></li> <li><strong>Safety Month starts Monday </strong>with an <a href="https://safetyservices.ucdavis.edu/safetymonth/week1">invitation to join the Rest and Revive Kickoff event</a>,<strong> </strong>noon to 1 p.m. Rest and Revive is a six-week email campaign presented by the Staff and Faculty Health and Well-Being Program; <a href="https://safetyservices.ucdavis.edu/units/occupational-health/health-well-being/events/restandrevive">learn more and register here</a>.</li> </ul><h2><strong>Remembering George Floyd</strong></h2> <p>Finally today, I want to commend UC Davis Police Chief Joe Farrow and city of Davis Police Chief Darren Pytel for their <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/joint-statement-uc-davis-city-davis-chiefs-police">joint statement</a> on the tragedy of George Floyd’s death in Minnesota. And here’s a <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/chancellors-statement-george-floyd">link to my statement</a>.</p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 74.946%"><iframe width="459" height="344" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Pi5SenFWQQ8?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p><strong>Sincerely,</strong></p> <p><strong>Gary S. May</strong><br /> Chancellor</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/chancellor-videos" hreflang="en">Chancellor&#039;s Videos</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 29 May 2020 22:40:08 +0000 Gary S. May 2566 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu Chancellor’s Statement on George Floyd https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/statement-on-george-floyd <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Chancellor’s Statement on George Floyd</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 28, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20190821-chancellor-uc-davis-28%20%281%29.jpg?h=6f44680e&amp;itok=zj7Vg9Di" width="1280" height="720" alt="Chancellor May sitting at desk looking somber" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description="To the UC Davis Community: “I can’t breathe.” These were the last words uttered by Eric Garner as he was being murdered on Staten Island in 2014. “I can’t breathe.” These were among the last words spoken by George Floyd as he suffered the same fate under hauntingly similar circumstances in Minneapolis on Monday evening. In 2014, I tried to explain the Garner incident to my daughters. Yesterday, I tried to explain the Floyd incident to myself. In both cases, I fell short. Murder captured on video defies explanation. Needless to say, these tragedies hit my family and me hard. I know it’s touched a deep nerve with many of you as well. You have reached out to express your support, concern, sadness and anger, and I appreciate it. To be honest, it’s been difficult for me to know how to address this because it is so personal. I lived in Georgia for nearly 30 years, where Ahmaud Arbery was hunted and killed. George Floyd could have been any African American man, including me. Beyond the constant barrage of fear of the negative consequences of birding while black, shopping while black, cooking out while black, exercising while black — it is just exhausting. And I’m tired. I can’t claim to speak for all African Americans or all people of color. And to ask me or others like me to do so is a burden others don’t have to carry. So I have thought a lot about how America got here, so long ago, and why we haven’t made as much progress as we often claim. The events of this week also cause me to believe even more strongly, if that’s possible, in building an inclusive environment that recognizes and respects people of all backgrounds and experiences. I remain committed to that and hope you will do what you can to eliminate racism, sexism, and other negative influences on our progression as a nation. Perhaps higher education can be that positive influence on lives beyond an education. Perhaps here we can create a way forward. Perhaps here we can breathe. Sincerely, Gary S. May Chancellor "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>To the UC Davis Community:</strong></p> <p>“I can’t breathe.” These were the last words uttered by Eric Garner as he was being murdered on Staten Island in 2014.</p> <p>“I can’t breathe.” These were among the last words spoken by George Floyd as he suffered the same fate under hauntingly similar circumstances in Minneapolis on Monday evening.</p> <p>In 2014, I tried to explain the Garner incident to my daughters. Yesterday, I tried to explain the Floyd incident to myself. In both cases, I fell short. Murder captured on video defies explanation.</p> <p>Needless to say, these tragedies hit my family and me hard. I know it’s touched a deep nerve with many of you as well. You have reached out to express your support, concern, sadness and anger, and I appreciate it. To be honest, it’s been difficult for me to know how to address this because it is so personal.</p> <p>I lived in Georgia for nearly 30 years, where Ahmaud Arbery was hunted and killed. George Floyd could have been any African American man, including me. Beyond the constant barrage of fear of the negative consequences of birding while black, shopping while black, cooking out while black, exercising while black — it is just exhausting. And I’m tired.</p> <p>I can’t claim to speak for all African Americans or all people of color. And to ask me or others like me to do so is a burden others don’t have to carry. So I have thought a lot about how America got here, so long ago, and why we haven’t made as much progress as we often claim.</p> <p>The events of this week also cause me to believe even more strongly, if that’s possible, in building an inclusive environment that recognizes and respects people of all backgrounds and experiences. I remain committed to that and hope you will do what you can to eliminate racism, sexism, and other negative influences on our progression as a nation.</p> <p>Perhaps higher education can be that positive influence on lives beyond an education. Perhaps here we can create a way forward. Perhaps here we can breathe.</p> <p><strong>Sincerely,</strong></p> <p><strong><strong>Gary S. May</strong></strong><br /> Chancellor</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 28 May 2020 22:49:40 +0000 Gary S. May 2561 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu Checking In With Chancellor May: Reflection https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/checking-in-with-chancellor-may-reflection <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Checking In With Chancellor May: Reflection</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 22, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20170803-chancellor-matsui-8259.jpg?h=845a916d&amp;itok=nlYkaduu" width="1280" height="720" alt="Chancellor Gary May seriously and thoughtfully looking to the side" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description=" To the UC Davis Community:  The upcoming weekend celebrates a very special day: Memorial Day, in remembrance of our nation’s fallen military personnel. Some of you may not know that our Memorial Union stands in tribute to our students and alumni who died in service, whose names are enshrined on the Gold Star Aggies Wall in the MU’s East Wing. Our annual Memorial Day Ceremony would have been yesterday. Unfortunately, it had to be canceled. However, we have posted a story and video, the latter by a student intern in our Office of Strategic Communications, Chris Selvo, featuring some of the people who would have spoken at this year’s ceremony, along with images from past ceremonies. I recommend taking time today or this weekend, to watch the video and reflect on our Gold Star Aggies and their sacrifice. Memorial Day also marks the unofficial start of summer, and, with warm weather in the forecast, I’m sure many of you are planning to head outdoors — to the UC Davis Arboretum, for example. Please keep in mind the physical distance guidelines that are so important in our fight against the coronavirus. Headlines coming out of the Board of Regents meeting this week indicated UC campuses “will open in the fall,” quoting President Janet Napolitano. Because headlines can be only so long, they missed her important caveat: “The question will be how much of that instruction is in-person versus how much is done remotely.” I have been saying this in my weekly letters, and nothing has changed. We are planning for multiple scenarios — and we have time to do that because of our late start to the new academic year, Sept. 30. We are aiming for “substantial flexibility,” whereby we can offer some in-person classes in the fall, based, as always, on advice from public health experts. We also anticipate that, with few exceptions, we will have remote course offerings available for students who either cannot be accommodated in physical classroom spaces due to the fall health directives or who need to remain isolated or at home, whether in Davis or elsewhere, due to pre-existing health conditions or other considerations. Getting here Yesterday I sent a letter to our newly admitted students, addressing the question, What will college look like in the fall? I said, “Your first year at UC Davis will likely be different than you imagined, but we are ready to support you every step of the way in your college journey.” We will be sending a message to all current students soon that will in the same vein describe our planning for both remote and in-person classes. Our returning Aggies have always been welcoming guides and mentors to new students, and we are confident that this will be so in the fall when all of us are learning to adapt to the realities of our current situation. In the meantime, our new freshmen have begun orientation in the new format we planned long before the pandemic. Instead of having students come to campus for two-day, in-person sessions through the summer, we are having them take “Aggie 101” and meet with their advisors and register for classes — all online, before participating in a weeklong orientation to campus life just before the start of fall quarter. I signed another letter this week, joining President Napolitano and the other UC chancellors, urging the Department of State and the Department of Homeland Security to issue clear guidance related to supporting the continued presence of international students, scholars and researchers at institutions of higher learning in the United States. “The international members of our campus communities are experiencing unprecedented levels of uncertainty as they seek to start or continue their studies and/or research in the United States in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic,” our letter says. Contact-tracing and testing Our vice chancellor for research, Prasant Mohapatra, a Distinguished Professor of computer science, and graduate student Vikram Rao announced today they had developed a web-based application called We-Care for contact-tracing that avoids the privacy issue that comes with contact-tracing through digital platforms for mobile devices, and provides a low-cost option to in-person contact-tracing. We-Care is customizable and preserves different levels of privacy while leveraging crowd-sourced information exchanges. You can participate by creating a profile (you can do so anonymously) and voluntarily “checking in” upon entering any building, business, venue, restaurant, etc. — indoor or outdoor. If you develop symptoms of COVID-19, or if you test positive or learn about being exposed to an infected person, you update your profile — and the app will notify people who had been near you within the last seven days. UC Davis Health announced it had reached a milestone of performing 10,000 molecular tests for COVID-19, from UC Davis patients and staff as well as residents at nursing homes, local community hospitals and other long-term facilities that did not have testing capabilities. I join with Iyda Antony, director of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, in congratulating and thanking our clinical pathology teams for their tireless efforts to get our essential COVID-19 tests validated and available to our patients, employees and community. Top ranking We had more good news this week from QS World University Rankings. QS already lists us No. 1 in the world in veterinary science, and, now, in the organization’s first USA rankings, UC Davis is tied for first in diversity and internationalization (tied with UCLA and New York University). This ranking is a testimony to our commitment to the values of diversity and equity, and our global engagement. In the overall USA rankings, UC Davis is ranked seventh among public universities and fourth among those in California. Our new QS ranking goes along with the 2020 Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization we received earlier this year from NAFSA: Association of International Educators. Congratulations to all. Virtual career fairs As spring quarter winds down, our graduates and other students are no doubt looking for employment opportunities, short- and long-term. Let’s not kid ourselves: The pandemic has challenged our economy. We are confident, though, that we are giving students the skills they need to get ahead. And we can help in their job hunt, too, via two UC-wide virtual career fairs next week: STEM Virtual Career Fair Including technical and scientific internship and full-time opportunities in a wide variety of industries. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. PDT Tuesday, May 26 Virtual Career Fair Including nontechnical internship and full-time opportunities in a wide variety of industries. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. PDT Wednesday, May 27. New companies are registering daily, so check back to the websites often. Our own UC Davis Internship and Career Center is up and running, virtually. Check out the website to learn how the ICC can be of assistance. One more note about employment: Our Human Resources unit is holding a Virtual Job Talk for people interested in working at UC Davis and/or UC Davis Health. The job talk will be from noon to 1 p.m. Thursday, May 28. Registration is required and can be arranged here. Financial strain Discussion at this week’s Board of Regents meeting also focused on the pandemic’s financial hit to the university system: $1.2 billion from mid-March through April. In response, President Napolitano instituted a salary freeze for policy-covered staff and a salary scale freeze for policy-covered, nonstudent academic appointees, and announced that she and all of the chancellors were voluntarily taking a 10 percent pay cut. At UC Davis, as we develop budget scenarios for next year, we are looking for ways to reduce expenses, such as eliminating nonessential business travel and renegotiating service agreements. Last month, we implemented a vacancy management program to evaluate the creation, replacement or backfilling of all staff positions, including an approval process of campus leadership and vetting through a central committee. We will continue to monitor the financial situation and will consider additional actions as appropriate. Mandatory Zoom update We have written a couple of times about the importance of using the latest version of Zoom, the tool that more and more of us are using more often for instruction and business meetings. There is now an urgency to update to Zoom 5.0: If you do not upgrade to 5.0, Zoom will block you from its platform starting May 30. Learn more in this article from Information and Educational Technology. And, just as a reminder, here’s a link to our Zoom Privacy and Security FAQs. Sustainability Summit Next Friday, May 29, from 10 a.m. to noon, we will hold our second annual Sustainability Summit, an online event that will include updates from a variety of student and faculty partners, and the announcement of our new Sustainability Champions. Camille Kirk, director of the Office of Sustainability, says she will be sharing other big news, as well. The link for the Sustainability Summit webinar will be emailed to people who register here. Reflection As I reflect this weekend on Memorial Day, I will also remember all the lives lost around the world to COVID-19, and to the remarkable work of UC Davis Health, and our researchers on both sides of the causeway, and our faculty and staff, all of whom have been through so much during this unprecedented time, and who have met the challenge. I say it a lot, but this is truly who we are. Sincerely,  Gary S. MayChancellor "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div> <p>To the UC Davis Community: </p> <p><span><span><span>The upcoming weekend celebrates a very special day: Memorial Day, in remembrance of our nation’s fallen military personnel. Some of you may not know that our Memorial Union stands in tribute to our students and alumni who died in service, whose names are enshrined on the Gold Star Aggies Wall in the MU’s East Wing. Our annual Memorial Day Ceremony would have been yesterday. Unfortunately, it had to be canceled. However, we have posted a <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/memorial-day-speakers-send-virtual-remembrances">story and video</a>, the latter by a student intern in our Office of Strategic Communications, Chris Selvo, featuring some of the people who would have spoken at this year’s ceremony, along with images from past ceremonies. I recommend taking time today or this weekend, to watch the video and reflect on our <a href="http://goldenmemorybook.ucdavis.edu/#/book">Gold Star Aggies</a> and their sacrifice.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>Memorial Day also marks the unofficial start of summer, and, with warm weather in the forecast, I’m sure many of you are planning to head outdoors — to the UC Davis Arboretum, for example. Please keep in mind the physical distance guidelines that are so important in our fight against the coronavirus.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>Headlines coming out of the Board of Regents meeting this week indicated UC campuses “will open in the fall,” quoting President Janet Napolitano. Because headlines can be only so long, they missed her important caveat: “The question will be how much of that instruction is in-person versus how much is done remotely.”</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>I have been saying this in my weekly letters, and nothing has changed. We are planning for multiple scenarios — and we have time to do that because of our late start to the new academic year, Sept. 30. We are aiming for “substantial flexibility,” whereby we can offer some in-person classes in the fall, based, as always, on advice from public health experts. We also anticipate that, with few exceptions, we will have remote course offerings available for students who either cannot be accommodated in physical classroom spaces due to the fall health directives or who need to remain isolated or at home, whether in Davis or elsewhere, due to pre-existing health conditions or other considerations.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Getting here</span></span></span></strong></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>Yesterday I sent a <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/admissions/undergraduate/chancellor-message">letter to our newly admitted students</a>, addressing the question, What will college look like in the fall? I said, “Your first year at UC Davis will likely be different than you imagined, but we are ready to support you every step of the way in your college journey.”</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>We will be sending a message to all current students soon that will in the same vein describe our planning for both remote and in-person classes. Our returning Aggies have always been welcoming guides and mentors to new students, and we are confident that this will be so in the fall when all of us are learning to adapt to the realities of our current situation.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>In the meantime, our new freshmen have begun orientation in the new format we planned long before the pandemic. Instead of having students come to campus for two-day, in-person sessions through the summer, we are having them take “Aggie 101” and meet with their advisors and register for classes — all online, before participating in a weeklong orientation to campus life just before the start of fall quarter.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>I signed another letter this week, joining President Napolitano and the other UC chancellors, urging the Department of State and the Department of Homeland Security to issue clear guidance related to supporting the continued presence of international students, scholars and researchers at institutions of higher learning in the United States. “The international members of our campus communities are experiencing unprecedented levels of uncertainty as they seek to start or continue their studies and/or research in the United States in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic,” our letter says.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Contact-tracing and testing</span></span></span></strong></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>Our vice chancellor for research, Prasant Mohapatra, a Distinguished Professor of computer science, and graduate student Vikram Rao announced today they had <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/vice-chancellor-research-graduate-student-develop-covid-19-contact-tracing-tool">developed a web-based application called We-Care for contact-tracing</a> that avoids the privacy issue that comes with contact-tracing through digital platforms for mobile devices, and provides a low-cost option to in-person contact-tracing.<br /><br /> We-Care is customizable and preserves different levels of privacy while leveraging crowd-sourced information exchanges. You can participate by creating a profile (you can do so anonymously) and voluntarily “checking in” upon entering any building, business, venue, restaurant, etc. — indoor or outdoor. If you develop symptoms of COVID-19, or if you test positive or learn about being exposed to an infected person, you update your profile — and the app will notify people who had been near you within the last seven days.<br /><br /> UC Davis Health announced it had reached a milestone of performing <a href="https://health.ucdavis.edu/health-news/newsroom/uc-davis-health-performs-10000th-molecular-test-for-covid-1/2020/05">10,000 molecular tests for COVID-19</a>, from UC Davis patients and staff as well as residents at nursing homes, local community hospitals and other long-term facilities that did not have testing capabilities. I join with Iyda Antony, director of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, in congratulating and thanking our clinical pathology teams for their tireless efforts to get our essential COVID-19 tests validated and available to our patients, employees and community.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Top ranking</span></span></span></strong></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>We had more good news this week from QS World University Rankings. QS already lists us No. 1 in the world in veterinary science, and, now, in the organization’s first USA rankings, <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/uc-davis-wins-national-recognition-diversity-internationalization">UC Davis is tied for first in diversity and internationalization</a> (tied with UCLA and New York University). This ranking is a testimony to our commitment to the values of diversity and equity, and our global engagement. In the overall USA rankings, UC Davis is ranked seventh among public universities and fourth among those in California.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>Our new QS ranking goes along with the <a href="https://globalaffairs.ucdavis.edu/news/uc-davis-nafsa-simon-award-internationalization">2020 Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization</a> we received earlier this year from NAFSA: Association of International Educators. Congratulations to all.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><strong><span><strong><span><span>Virtual career fairs</span></span></strong></span></strong></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>As spring quarter winds down, our graduates and other students are no doubt looking for employment opportunities, short- and long-term. Let’s not kid ourselves: The pandemic has challenged our economy. We are confident, though, that we are giving students the skills they need to get ahead. And we can help in their job hunt, too, via two UC-wide virtual career fairs next week:</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <div> <ul type="disc"><li><span><span><span><a href="https://www.careereco.com/Fair/EventDetails?fairId=baab1e75-f3c0-4411-8f73-aba100fdae3e">STEM Virtual Career Fair</a> Including technical and scientific internship and full-time opportunities in a wide variety of industries. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. PDT Tuesday, May 26</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><a href="https://www.careereco.com/Fair/EventDetails?fairId=ed2d2265-824d-45f7-a933-aba301285802">Virtual Career Fair</a> Including nontechnical internship and full-time opportunities in a wide variety of industries. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. PDT Wednesday, May 27.</span></span></span></li> </ul></div> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>New companies are registering daily, so check back to the websites often.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>Our own <a href="https://t.e2ma.net/click/fqw8bf/fiu9ov/rvobxeb">UC Davis Internship and Career Center</a> is up and running, virtually. Check out the website to learn how the ICC can be of assistance.<br /><br /> One more note about employment: Our Human Resources unit is holding a Virtual Job Talk for people interested in working at UC Davis and/or UC Davis Health. The job talk will be from noon to 1 p.m. Thursday, May 28. <a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/jobtalk">Registration is required and can be arranged here.</a></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Financial strain</span></span></span></strong></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>Discussion at this week’s Board of Regents meeting also focused on the pandemic’s financial hit to the university system: $1.2 billion from mid-March through April. In response, President Napolitano instituted a salary freeze for policy-covered staff and a salary scale freeze for policy-covered, nonstudent academic appointees, and announced that she and all of the chancellors were voluntarily taking a 10 percent pay cut.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>At UC Davis, as we develop budget scenarios for next year, we are looking for ways to reduce expenses, such as eliminating nonessential business travel and renegotiating service agreements. Last month, we implemented a vacancy management program to evaluate the creation, replacement or backfilling of all staff positions, including an approval process of campus leadership and vetting through a central committee. We will continue to monitor the financial situation and will consider additional actions as appropriate.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Mandatory Zoom update</span></span></span></strong></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>We have written a couple of times about the importance of using the latest version of Zoom, the tool that more and more of us are using more often for instruction and business meetings. There is now an urgency to update to Zoom 5.0: If you do not upgrade to 5.0, Zoom will block you from its platform starting May 30. <a href="https://iet.ucdavis.edu/news/keep-using-zoom-upgrade-new-version-may-30">Learn more in this article from Information and Educational Technology.</a></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>And, just as a reminder, here’s a link to our <a href="https://keepteaching.ucdavis.edu/faq-zoom-privacy-and-security-uc-davis">Zoom Privacy and Security FAQs</a>.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Sustainability Summit</span></span></span></strong></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>Next Friday, May 29, from 10 a.m. to noon, we will hold our second annual <a href="https://earthday.ucdavis.edu/?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D145045000">Sustainability Summit</a>, an online event that will include updates from a variety of student and faculty partners, and the announcement of our new Sustainability Champions. Camille Kirk, director of the Office of Sustainability, says she will be sharing other big news, as well. The link for the Sustainability Summit webinar will be emailed to<strong> </strong>people who <a href="https://ucdavis.us11.list-manage.com/track/click?u=6f069e1185b00ce75fc69c5f7&amp;id=660520f7ee&amp;e=ff3318fff4">register here</a>.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Reflection</span></span></span></strong></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span>As I reflect this weekend on Memorial Day, I will also remember all the lives lost around the world to COVID-19, and to the remarkable work of UC Davis Health, and our researchers on both sides of the causeway, and our faculty and staff, all of whom have been through so much during this unprecedented time, and who have met the challenge. I say it a lot, but this is truly who we are.</span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKQUK7dSkEk&amp;feature=youtu.be"><span><span><span><img src="https://mcusercontent.com/3025570cb5a79a72f39bf7087/images/d14ef7ac-1fdd-4397-94e5-17ee48a797f1.jpg" /></span></span></span></a></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><strong>Sincerely,</strong><br />  <br /><strong>Gary S. May</strong><br /><em>Chancellor</em></p> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/chancellor-videos" hreflang="en">Chancellor&#039;s Videos</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 22 May 2020 21:10:50 +0000 Gary S. May 2536 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu Coronavirus Update for Incoming Fall 2020 Students https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/undergraduate-admissions-chancellor-update-fall-2020 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Coronavirus Update for Incoming Fall 2020 Students</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 21, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/chancellor-gary-s-may-writing-desk_6.jpg?h=34bb14c3&amp;itok=GVasY-ls" width="1280" height="720" alt="Chancellor May sitting at desk writing a letter" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description="Welcome to UC Davis! I am so pleased that you are making plans to join us in the fall. Building connections with undergraduates like you is a highlight of being the chancellor at our top-ranked public research university. I’m sure you are wondering what college will look like for you. After all, your final weeks of high school and senior year celebrations were already disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. I commend you for pushing forward. So, I encourage you to keep planning for a bright future that includes interactive learning, career exploration and an amazing college experience. At UC Davis, we work daily with state and county public health officials, and with the University of California Office of the President to follow evolving directives related to the pandemic. Your first year at UC Davis will likely be different than you imagined, but we are ready to support you every step of the way in your college journey. Fall Quarter Planning UC Davis operates on the quarter system, with fall 2020 classes starting September 30. That is later than some colleges on the semester system who have already announced their plans. With our later start date in mind, we are planning for multiple scenarios, including offering in-person classes in fall 2020, if possible. These decisions will depend on the state of the pandemic and will be based on advice from public health authorities and experts. With few exceptions, we anticipate that course offerings will be available remotely for students who cannot be accommodated in physical classroom spaces due to the fall health directives. This would also apply to those who need to remain isolated due to preexisting health conditions or other considerations. Thus, we anticipate that our instructional plan will enable substantial flexibility that supports student learning and degree progress. Students who cannot physically join us on campus because of travel restrictions or the inability to obtain a student visa will also be able to learn remotely. We will provide more updates about the status of fall instruction in mid-June. Getting Started Our three-part Orientation program is already underway, with Aggie 101 available online to all freshmen who have submitted their Statement of Intent to Register (SIR) to UC Davis. Please complete Aggie 101, if you haven’t already. You will find resources for your academic, personal and social growth, and be introduced to the support available to you at UC Davis. You can access Aggie 101 through MyAdmissions. Aggie Advising and class registration—which are already planned as online activities—will take place over the summer. As you complete these orientation steps, you can look forward to more information about the final step, Aggie Orientation. Aggie Orientation will help you build support networks with fellow Aggies that include new and current students, faculty, and staff, and discover how you can contribute to our diverse community. We know you also have questions about where you will live, the cost of tuition and fees, and how financial aid can help. Here are some things we can tell you now: Housing: Our Student Housing and Dining Services team is planning for multiple scenarios that will allow students to live on campus this fall while keeping the safety and health of all as the top priority. While the extension of our original housing application deadline has passed, if you still need housing, please contact Student Housing and Dining Services about your options. We know it’s hard to make decisions during this time. However, you can be assured that we will refund housing reservation fees if contracts need to be canceled due to the pandemic. Please see our FAQs related to housing or reach out to the Student Housing and Dining Services office directly through email at studenthousing@ucdavis.edu. Financial aid: Our Financial Aid and Scholarships office is working hard to make sure all students have the financial aid they need in these changing times. Our office will consider revisions to individual financial aid offers for families who have been impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. An appeal form will be available in July. For now, families can use our Financial Aid Estimator to see what a revised financial aid package might look like based on present situations. You can see our FAQs related to financial aid, or you can reach out to the Financial Aid and Scholarships office directly through Contact an Expert. Tuition and fees: Tuition and mandatory fees have been set regardless of the method of instruction. They will not be refunded in the event that instruction occurs remotely for any part of the 2020–21 academic year. We know that remote instruction, or a hybrid of remote and in-person instruction, is different from the traditional college experience that you’ve been looking forward to for so long. We are working hard, as are you and your family, to adjust to the current situation and carry forward our mission of teaching, research and public service in these difficult times. Professors continue to teach and direct essential research activities. Staff continue to provide, and in many cases have increased, our support services to meet the needs of students during the coronavirus pandemic. I am proud to highlight that many of our fees support student services that have been approved through our student government. These services will continue to be offered despite the coronavirus pandemic. As always, all UC Davis students will continue to receive a world-class education that prepares them for the careers of the future. This comprehensive education is needed more than ever as the world changes and adapts to current challenges. Looking Ahead While the coronavirus pandemic changes our world and impacts all of our lives, at UC Davis we also see opportunities to expand our teaching, knowledge, research and creativity during this time. I am encouraged to know that you will be bringing your voice and ideas to our campus as we continue to be at the forefront of conversations about human and animal health, food and agriculture, climate change, engineering and the environment, social change and creative expression. These conversations are more critical than ever. I am confident that you will receive the highest level of instruction and support as you begin your college experience with us this fall. I encourage you to learn more about how we are adapting and growing as a university, how our faculty have embraced remote learning options and how we are supporting students. You can also watch video updates that my wife, LeShelle, and I give to campus every Friday to get a better idea of how the Aggie community is rallying together during this time. UC Davis is a place where classmates help each other succeed. That attitude of support spreads across our campus as students, faculty and staff collaborate to find success for everyone in our community. Our collective response to the coronavirus pandemic is no different. We will get through this, together. Go Ags!   Sincerely,Gary S. MayChancellor "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Welcome to UC Davis! I am so pleased that you are making plans to join us in the fall. Building connections with undergraduates like you is a highlight of being the chancellor at our top-ranked public research university.</p> <p>I’m sure you are wondering what college will look like for you. After all, your final weeks of high school and senior year celebrations were already disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. I commend you for pushing forward. So, I encourage you to keep planning for a bright future that includes interactive learning, career exploration and an amazing college experience.</p> <p>At UC Davis, we work daily with state and county public health officials, and with the University of California Office of the President to follow evolving directives related to the pandemic. Your first year at UC Davis will likely be different than you imagined, but we are ready to support you every step of the way in your college journey.</p> <h4><strong>Fall Quarter Planning</strong></h4> <p>UC Davis operates on the quarter system, with fall 2020 classes starting September 30. That is later than some colleges on the semester system who have already announced their plans. With our later start date in mind, we are planning for multiple scenarios, including offering in-person classes in fall 2020, if possible. These decisions will depend on the state of the pandemic and will be based on advice from public health authorities and experts.</p> <p>With few exceptions, we anticipate that course offerings will be available remotely for students who cannot be accommodated in physical classroom spaces due to the fall health directives. This would also apply to those who need to remain isolated due to preexisting health conditions or other considerations.</p> <p>Thus, we anticipate that our instructional plan will enable substantial flexibility that supports student learning and degree progress. Students who cannot physically join us on campus because of travel restrictions or the inability to obtain a student visa will also be able to learn remotely. We will provide more updates about the status of fall instruction in mid-June.</p> <h4><strong>Getting Started</strong></h4> <p>Our three-part <a href="https://orientation.ucdavis.edu/">Orientation</a> program is already underway, with Aggie 101 available online to all freshmen who have submitted their Statement of Intent to Register (SIR) to UC Davis. Please complete Aggie 101, if you haven’t already. You will find resources for your academic, personal and social growth, and be introduced to the support available to you at UC Davis. You can access Aggie 101 through <a href="https://myadmissions.ucdavis.edu/applicants/">MyAdmissions</a>.</p> <p>Aggie Advising and class registration—which are already planned as online activities—will take place over the summer. As you complete these orientation steps, you can look forward to more information about the final step, Aggie Orientation. Aggie Orientation will help you build support networks with fellow Aggies that include new and current students, faculty, and staff, and discover how you can contribute to our diverse community.</p> <p>We know you also have questions about where you will live, the cost of tuition and fees, and how financial aid can help. Here are some things we can tell you now:</p> <p><strong>Housing:</strong> Our Student Housing and Dining Services team is planning for multiple scenarios that will allow students to live on campus this fall while keeping the safety and health of all as the top priority. While the extension of our original housing application deadline has passed, if you still need housing, please contact Student Housing and Dining Services about your options.</p> <p>We know it’s hard to make decisions during this time. However, you can be assured that we will refund housing reservation fees if contracts need to be canceled due to the pandemic. Please see our <a href="https://housing.ucdavis.edu/covid19-faq">FAQs related to housing</a> or reach out to the Student Housing and Dining Services office directly through email at <a href="mailto:studenthousing@ucdavis.edu">studenthousing@ucdavis.edu</a>.</p> <p><strong>Financial aid:</strong> Our Financial Aid and Scholarships office is working hard to make sure all students have the financial aid they need in these changing times. Our office will consider revisions to individual financial aid offers for families who have been impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. An appeal form will be available in July.</p> <p>For now, families can use our <a href="https://myawards.ucdavis.edu/AidEstimator">Financial Aid Estimator</a> to see what a revised financial aid package might look like based on present situations. You can see our <a href="https://financialaid.ucdavis.edu/frequently-asked-questions">FAQs related to financial aid</a>, or you can reach out to the Financial Aid and Scholarships office directly through <a href="https://my.ucdavis.edu/ask_us/">Contact an Expert</a>.</p> <p><strong>Tuition and fees:</strong> <a href="https://financeandbusiness.ucdavis.edu/student-resources/tuition-fees/undergraduate">Tuition and mandatory fees</a> have been set regardless of the method of instruction. They will not be refunded in the event that instruction occurs remotely for any part of the 2020–21 academic year.</p> <p>We know that remote instruction, or a hybrid of remote and in-person instruction, is different from the traditional college experience that you’ve been looking forward to for so long. We are working hard, as are you and your family, to adjust to the current situation and carry forward our mission of teaching, research and public service in these difficult times. Professors continue to teach and direct essential research activities. Staff continue to provide, and in many cases have increased, our support services to meet the needs of students during the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>I am proud to highlight that many of our fees support student services that have been approved through our student government. These services will <a href="https://studentaffairs.ucdavis.edu/virtual-ucdavis">continue to be offered</a> despite the coronavirus pandemic. As always, all UC Davis students will continue to receive a world-class education that prepares them for the careers of the future. This comprehensive education is needed more than ever as the world changes and adapts to current challenges.</p> <h4><strong>Looking Ahead</strong></h4> <p>While the <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/">coronavirus pandemic</a> changes our world and impacts all of our lives, at UC Davis we also see opportunities to expand our teaching, knowledge, research and creativity during this time. I am encouraged to know that you will be bringing your voice and ideas to our campus as we continue to be at the forefront of conversations about human and animal health, food and agriculture, climate change, engineering and the environment, social change and creative expression. These conversations are more critical than ever.</p> <p>I am confident that you will receive the highest level of instruction and support as you begin your college experience with us this fall. I encourage you to learn more about how we are <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/spring-snapshots/">adapting and growing as a university</a>, how our faculty have <a href="https://keepteaching.ucdavis.edu/">embraced remote learning options</a> and how we are <a href="https://studentaffairs.ucdavis.edu/virtual-ucdavis">supporting students</a>. You can also watch <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/checking-chancellor-may">video updates</a> that my wife, LeShelle, and I give to campus every Friday to get a better idea of how the Aggie community is rallying together during this time.</p> <p>UC Davis is a place where classmates help each other succeed. That attitude of support spreads across our campus as students, faculty and staff collaborate to find success for everyone in our community. Our collective response to the coronavirus pandemic is no different. We will get through this, together. Go Ags!</p> <p> </p> <p>Sincerely,<br /><strong>Gary S. May</strong><br /><em>Chancellor</em></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 21 May 2020 23:39:39 +0000 Gary S. May 2531 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu Checking In With Chancellor May: Perseverance https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/checking-in-with-chancellor-may-perseverance <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Checking In With Chancellor May: Perseverance</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 15, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/chancellor-gary-s-may-writing-desk_5.jpg?h=c71d0c67&amp;itok=SMP8PT_1" width="1280" height="720" alt="Chancellor May sitting at desk writing a letter" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description=" To the UC Davis Community: Many of our neighboring counties are starting to reopen, after meeting Gov. Newsom’s criteria aimed at preventing a resurgence of the coronavirus. Yolo and Sacramento counties are not quite there yet. We continue to be in close contact with the public health authorities. At the same time, our Operations Scenario Planning Group is discussing a gradual return to office working over the next few months. More details will be forthcoming as they are developed. I know we are all anxious to return to more standard operating procedures, but the health and safety of our campus community has always been our No. 1 priority — so we must wait until the conditions permit this transition. Beyond the logistics, we have other important issues ahead, such as the revised state budget that the governor released yesterday — showing a 10 percent cut to UC and the California State University system. Here’s how UC President Janet Napolitano responded: “The University of California recognizes the unprecedented challenges California is facing in the wake of COVID-19 and regrets that Gov. Newsom was put into a position to steeply reduce the university’s budget in response to the state’s dramatically diminished revenues. Regardless, UC stands with the governor and the Legislature to help lift the state out of this economic crisis.&quot; “In spite of these budget revisions, our focus will remain on our students, our employees and the UC community. We are committed to continuing our mission of teaching, research and public service — including the crucial patient care provided by our medical centers in the midst of this pandemic — that benefits California and the world. We will continue to work with the Legislature to secure additional sources of funding to see us through this difficult time.” Research moves into Phase 1x During the pandemic, we have taken on COVID-19 projects — this is what we do as a top-tier research institution: contribute to the world’s battle against this virus. This week we implemented Phase 1x of our ramp-up plan: small, incremental steps to allow the restart of further critical research projects while maintaining adherence to public health guidance and maintaining appropriate hazard mitigation strategies. There is a strict approval process in place. For example, staffing is limited to one person per approximately 250 square feet of lab space. Also, principal investigators need to have a process in place to log access to their facilities for contact tracing if needed. Again, this is a gradual ramp-up in a four-phase plan, and changes may take effect at any time, as the pandemic evolves. Our goal is to enable projects that are critical while maintaining a low density of people in a space and minimal person-to-person contacts. We’ve reported extensively on our COVID-19 research, on the Sacramento and Davis campuses, and next week we will present our second UC Davis LIVE: COVID-19 program on Facebook and YouTube: 11 a.m. Thursday, May 21, with two of our UC Davis Health physicians involved in COVID-19 treatments: Professor Stuart Cohen, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, and director of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control; and Sarah Barnhard, an assistant clinical professor and director of Transfusion Medicine. Assessing student learning I join Provost Ralph Hexter, Senate Chair Kristin Lagattuta and Vice Provost Carolyn Thomas (see here for their full letter) in commending instructors for “the dedication, care and commitment that you are bringing to your courses during this emergency time of remote instruction. It is because of your extraordinary efforts that we are able to continue our teaching mission.” As they note, “Student learning assessments, including exams, are an integral part of learning and the educational experience of a course.” Although “we encourage instructors to assess student learning through means other than proctored examinations when possible,” instructors are the final authority on how best to measure student learning in their courses. Sometimes this will include proctored midterm and final examinations, for which the campus has several software tools available. For further information, visit Keep Teaching. Undergraduate advising As we wrap up Week 7 of instruction, we know our undergraduates are balancing a growing load of midterms, papers, and final projects and exams. Our academic advisors have been meeting with students via Zoom throughout the quarter, and have compiled a list of ways families can support their students at home. Graduate students Those of you who are nearing your degrees may be concerned about the impact COVID-19 may have on your normative time to degree. In recognition of the challenges that COVID-19-related closures have had on all graduate students at UC Davis, Graduate Studies, with the support of the Graduate Council, will provide a one-year blanket extension of time to degree for students. This exception is just one outcome of the ongoing effort Graduate Studies has been engaging in to proactively address emerging needs and advocate for additional flexibilities and support for graduate students during this challenging time. For more information about this blanket exception and other efforts made by Graduate Studies to support graduate education in response to COVID-19, please visit this page on the Graduate Studies website. Fall quarter Last week we talked about fall quarter, and what we envision it will look like. Remember, our academic year begins later than most — fall quarter instruction begins Sept. 30 — so there is a lot of time between now and then for changes in how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting our local and state communities. So, as we said last week, the only certainty is that we can have no certainty now about the state of the pandemic in late September. However, as we said, we are working with individual departments and professional schools to find ways to offer some in-person classes in the fall, based, as always, on advice from public health experts. As well, we anticipate that, with few exceptions, course offerings will also be available remotely for students who either cannot be accommodated in physical classroom spaces due to the fall health directives or who need to remain isolated due to pre-existing health conditions or other considerations. There are also instructors who will need to teach remotely for the same reasons. Thus, we anticipate that our instructional plan will enable substantial flexibility to support student learning and degree progress. For information about housing and dining services in the fall, please refer to this FAQ. CoHo and Scrubs are back! Our beloved Coffee House is back in business, as of yesterday, with a limited menu for delivery or pickup only. Breakfast sandwiches and burritos, ciabatta sandwiches, Especial Burritos and Especial Taco Salads, plus other salads, wraps and personal pizzas, baked goods, espresso drinks and coffee, and CoHo Blasts — we have really been missing our Coffee House! Ordering is done through the Grubhub app, and delivery is available to campus and the city of Davis. Come Monday, Scrubs will be open in the Health Sciences District, offering grab ’n’ go service. In alignment with public health guidance, several service modifications have been implemented, including requirements for face coverings and physical distancing (6 feet minimum), and no cash transactions. Emergency relief funds We have distributed most of our emergency relief funding to our students, about $14.5 million to some 17,200 students so far, using federal funds from the CARES Act for Title IV-eligible students and institutional funds for others (including undocumented/DACAmented AB540-eligible students, eligible noncitizens and international students). Notes: Title IV-eligible undergraduates, in order to receive emergency relief funding, must have a Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA on file or submit one by May 30. Graduate and professional students are encouraged to file a 2019-20 FAFSA or complete a certification with the campus confirming eligibility for Title IV funding by May 30 to receive assistance. Undocumented AB540-eligible students must have a California Dream Act Application on file or submit one by May 30. More information is available in two sets of FAQs: CARES Act funding Institutional funding for California Dream Act applicants Reporting protocol Committing to a healthy working environment is everyone’s responsibility. If you are sick, you should stay home. In addition, we have reporting protocols designed to enable campus response to COVID risk guided by our medical directors. The protocols include not only situations involving COVID testing but includes situations of general concerned about members of the campus community having COVID-19, whether on or off campus. Other reasons to report, as outlined on this Safety Services webpage: COVID-19 test has been administered to you, an immediate family member or a UC Davis colleague. Positive COVID-19 diagnosis has been returned to you, an immediate family member or a UC Davis colleague. The webpage includes the mandatory reporting protocols for the Davis and Sacramento campuses. The Davis campus protocol activates a team including representatives from Student Health and Occupational Health, Human Resources, Campus Counsel, Environmental Health and Safety, and Custodial Services. Furthermore, the team coordinates actions with Yolo County Public Health through our medical directors. Those actions may include further testing and/or contact tracing. For the integrity of the process and to maintain coordination with our local health authority, it is vitally important others do not attempt to communicate or assume those responsibilities. ASAP calendars I’ve been telling you about the wonderful services available through the Academic and Staff Assistance Program, or ASAP, and this week I am happy to provide links to eight programs next week on the Davis and Sacramento campuses. Thank you to everyone at ASAP and Human Resources who put together new calendar pages showing all the programs on the Davis and Sacramento campuses, with dates, times and sign-up information. The ASAP Davis calendar page lists these programs next week: Coping With the Impact of Using Technology for Remote Work(workshop) — Tuesday, May 19 Working and Parenting (drop-in session) — Wednesday, May 20 Grief During COVID-19 (drop-in session) — Friday, May 22 The ASAP Sacramento calendar page lists five drop-in sessions next week: Staying Engaged And Nurturing Community While Maintaining Physical Distance — Monday, May 18 Staying Centered in the Face of Uncertainty — Tuesday, May 19 Coping With Grief and Loss — Wednesday, May 20 Calming Fear and Anxiety — Thursday, May 21 The Ups and Downs of Sheltering in Place — Friday, May 22 So, please, reach out for assistance, join in these programs. We will get through this, together. Sincerely, Gary S. May Chancellor   "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div> <p>To the UC Davis Community:</p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Many of our neighboring counties are starting to reopen, after meeting Gov. Newsom’s criteria aimed at preventing a resurgence of the coronavirus. Yolo and Sacramento counties are not quite there yet. We continue to be in close contact with the public health authorities.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>At the same time, our Operations Scenario Planning Group is discussing a gradual return to office working over the next few months. More details will be forthcoming as they are developed. I know we are all anxious to return to more standard operating procedures, but the health and safety of our campus community has always been our No. 1 priority — so we must wait until the conditions permit this transition.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Beyond the logistics, we have other important issues ahead, such as the revised state budget that the governor released yesterday — showing a 10 percent cut to UC and the California State University system. Here’s how UC President Janet Napolitano responded:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“The University of California recognizes the unprecedented challenges California is facing in the wake of COVID-19 and regrets that Gov. Newsom was put into a position to steeply reduce the university’s budget in response to the state’s dramatically diminished revenues. Regardless, UC stands with the governor and the Legislature to help lift the state out of this economic crisis."</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“In spite of these budget revisions, our focus will remain on our students, our employees and the UC community. We are committed to continuing our mission of teaching, research and public service — including the crucial patient care provided by our medical centers in the midst of this pandemic — that benefits California and the world. We will continue to work with the Legislature to secure additional sources of funding to see us through this difficult time.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Research moves into Phase 1x</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>During the pandemic, we have taken on COVID-19 projects — this is what we do as a top-tier research institution: contribute to the world’s battle against this virus. This week we implemented Phase 1x of our ramp-up plan: small, incremental steps to allow the restart of further critical research projects while maintaining adherence to public health guidance and maintaining appropriate hazard mitigation strategies.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>There is a strict approval process in place. For example, staffing is limited to one person per approximately 250 square feet of lab space. Also, principal investigators need to have a process in place to log access to their facilities for contact tracing if needed.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Again, this is a gradual ramp-up in a four-phase plan, and changes may take effect at any time, as the pandemic evolves. Our goal is to enable projects that are critical while maintaining a low density of people in a space and minimal person-to-person contacts.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>We’ve reported extensively on our COVID-19 research, on the Sacramento and Davis campuses, and next week we will present our second UC Davis LIVE: COVID-19 program on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/574681496508005/">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/UCDavis">YouTube</a>: 11 a.m. Thursday, May 21, with two of our UC Davis Health physicians involved in COVID-19 treatments: Professor Stuart Cohen, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, and director of Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control; and Sarah Barnhard, an assistant clinical professor and director of Transfusion Medicine.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Assessing student learning</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I join Provost Ralph Hexter, Senate Chair Kristin Lagattuta and Vice Provost Carolyn Thomas (see <a href="https://academicsenate.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk3876/files/inline-files/final_web_5.5.20.pdf">here</a> for their full letter) in commending instructors for “the dedication, care and commitment that you are bringing to your courses during this emergency time of remote instruction. It is because of your extraordinary efforts that we are able to continue our teaching mission.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>As they note, “Student learning assessments, including exams, are an integral part of learning and the educational experience of a course.” Although “we encourage instructors to assess student learning through means other than proctored examinations when possible,” instructors are the final authority on how best to measure student learning in their courses. Sometimes this will include proctored midterm and final examinations, for which the campus has several software tools available. For further information, visit <a href="https://keepteaching.ucdavis.edu/test">Keep Teaching</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><strong><span><span>Undergraduate advising</span></span></strong></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>As we wrap up Week 7 of instruction, we know our undergraduates are balancing a growing load of midterms, papers, and final projects and exams. Our academic advisors have been meeting with students via Zoom throughout the quarter, and have compiled <a href="https://academicadvising.ucdavis.edu/tips-families">a list of ways families can support their students at home</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Graduate students</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Those of you who are nearing your degrees may be concerned about the impact COVID-19 may have on your normative time to degree. In recognition of the challenges that COVID-19-related closures have had on all graduate students at UC Davis, Graduate Studies, with the support of the Graduate Council, will provide a one-year blanket extension of time to degree for students.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This exception is just one outcome of the ongoing effort Graduate Studies has been engaging in to proactively address emerging needs and advocate for additional flexibilities and support for graduate students during this challenging time. For more information about this blanket exception and other efforts made by Graduate Studies to support graduate education in response to COVID-19, <a href="https://grad.ucdavis.edu/news/advocating-you-supporting-graduate-education-light-covid-19">please visit this page on the Graduate Studies website</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Fall quarter</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Last week we talked about fall quarter, and what we envision it will look like. Remember, our academic year begins later than most — fall quarter instruction begins Sept. 30 — so there is a lot of time between now and then for changes in how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting our local and state communities. So, as we said last week, the only certainty is that we can have no certainty now about the state of the pandemic in late September.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>However, as we said, we are working with individual departments and professional schools to find ways to offer some in-person classes in the fall, based, as always, on advice from public health experts. As well, we anticipate that, with few exceptions, course offerings will also be available remotely for students who either cannot be accommodated in physical classroom spaces due to the fall health directives or who need to remain isolated due to pre-existing health conditions or other considerations. There are also instructors who will need to teach remotely for the same reasons. Thus, we anticipate that our instructional plan will enable substantial flexibility to support student learning and degree progress.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://housing.ucdavis.edu/covid19-faq/">For information about housing and dining services in the fall, please refer to this FAQ.</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>CoHo and Scrubs are back!</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Our beloved <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/coho-back-open-delivery-pickup-may-14">Coffee House is back in business</a>, as of yesterday, with a limited menu for delivery or pickup only. Breakfast sandwiches and burritos, ciabatta sandwiches, Especial Burritos and Especial Taco Salads, plus other salads, wraps and personal pizzas, baked goods, espresso drinks and coffee, and CoHo Blasts — we have really been missing our Coffee House! Ordering is done through the Grubhub app, and delivery is available to campus and the city of Davis.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Come Monday, Scrubs will be open in the Health Sciences District, offering grab ’n’ go service. In alignment with public health guidance, several service modifications have been implemented, including requirements for face coverings and physical distancing (6 feet minimum), and no cash transactions.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Emergency relief funds</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>We have distributed most of our emergency relief funding to our students, about $14.5 million to some 17,200 students so far, using federal funds from the CARES Act for Title IV-eligible students and institutional funds for others (including undocumented/DACAmented AB540-eligible students, eligible noncitizens and international students).</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Notes: Title IV-eligible undergraduates, in order to receive emergency relief funding, must have a Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA on file or submit one by May 30. Graduate and professional students are encouraged to file a 2019-20 FAFSA or complete a certification with the campus confirming eligibility for Title IV funding by May 30 to receive assistance. Undocumented AB540-eligible students must have a California Dream Act Application on file or submit one by May 30.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>More information is available in two sets of FAQs:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <div> <ul type="disc"><li><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://financialaid.ucdavis.edu/cares-act-faqs">CARES Act funding</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://bit.ly/UCDAB540-CAREACT-FAQ">Institutional funding for California Dream Act applicants</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></div> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Reporting protocol</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Committing to a healthy working environment is everyone’s responsibility. If you are sick, you should stay home. In addition, we have reporting protocols designed to enable campus response to COVID risk guided by our medical directors. The protocols include not only situations involving COVID testing but includes situations of general concerned about members of the campus community having COVID-19, whether on or off campus.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Other reasons to report, as outlined on this <a href="https://safetyservices.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/reporting-tests-concerns-confirmed-cases">Safety Services webpage</a>: </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <div> <ul type="disc"><li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>COVID-19 test has been administered</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> to you, an immediate family member or a UC Davis colleague.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Positive COVID-19 diagnosis has been returned </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>to you, an immediate family member or a UC Davis colleague.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></div> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The webpage includes the <a href="https://safetyservices.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/reporting-tests-concerns-confirmed-cases">mandatory reporting protocols</a><strong> </strong>for the Davis and Sacramento campuses.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The Davis campus protocol activates a team including representatives from Student Health and Occupational Health, Human Resources, Campus Counsel, Environmental Health and Safety, and Custodial Services. Furthermore, the team coordinates actions with Yolo County Public Health through our medical directors. Those actions may include further testing and/or contact tracing. For the integrity of the process and to maintain coordination with our local health authority, it is vitally important others do not attempt to communicate or assume those responsibilities.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>ASAP calendars</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I’ve been telling you about the wonderful services available through the <a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/asap">Academic and Staff Assistance Program, or ASAP</a>, and this week I am happy to provide links to eight programs next week on the Davis and Sacramento campuses.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Thank you to everyone at ASAP and Human Resources who put together new calendar pages showing all the programs on the Davis and Sacramento campuses, with dates, times and sign-up information.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The <a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/asap/ucd-virtual-support-groups">ASAP Davis calendar page</a> lists these programs next week:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <div> <ul type="disc"><li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Coping With the Impact of Using Technology for Remote Work</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>(workshop) — Tuesday, May 19</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Working and Parenting (drop-in session) —</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> Wednesday, May 20</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Grief During COVID-19 (drop-in session) — </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>Friday, May 22</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></div> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The <a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/asap/ucdh-virtual-support-groups">ASAP Sacramento calendar page</a> lists five drop-in sessions next week:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <div> <ul type="disc"><li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Staying Engaged And Nurturing Community While Maintaining Physical Distance —</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> Monday, May 18</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Staying Centered in the Face of Uncertainty —</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> Tuesday, May 19</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Coping With Grief and Loss —</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> Wednesday, May 20</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Calming Fear and Anxiety —</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> Thursday, May 21</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>The Ups and Downs of Sheltering in Place —</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> Friday, May 22</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></div> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>So, please, reach out for assistance, join in these programs. We will get through this, together.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 74.946%"><iframe width="459" height="344" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CZxLkN95nN4?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p><strong>Sincerely,</strong></p> <p><strong>Gary S. May</strong><br /> Chancellor</p> <p> </p> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/chancellor-videos" hreflang="en">Chancellor&#039;s Videos</a></div> </div> </div> Sat, 16 May 2020 00:21:15 +0000 Gary S. May 2526 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu Checking In With Chancellor May: The Essentials https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/checking-in-with-chancellor-may-the-essentials <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Checking In With Chancellor May: The Essentials</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 08, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/chancellor-gary-s-may-writing-desk_4.jpg?h=e6fd54c1&amp;itok=zknuwgwt" width="1280" height="720" alt="Chancellor May sitting at desk writing a letter" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description="To the UC Davis Community: Although our main campus is fairly quiet, there is — as you all know — much going on, much that you all are doing. UC Davis is defined as essential in Yolo County’s shelter-in-place order, which states that educational institutions can stay open for the purposes of facilitating distance learning or performing essential functions, provided that we follow social distancing protocol and, more recently, the added requirement for face coverings. We have accordingly significantly modified campus operations, but our mission continues. Our faculty, on short notice, successfully converted to remote examinations for winter quarter and remote instruction for spring quarter. I commend them once again for the work they are doing to connect with their students, and I am also grateful to our IT personnel behind the scenes. As a major research institution, we can never close. We have livestock and agricultural projects to care for on the Davis campus, and extensive facilities to maintain on the Davis and Sacramento campuses. We have clinical services for human and animal health. We have several hundred students living with us in residential housing. Construction continues. For more examples, please take a look at our daily Spring Quarter Snapshots, all of which are compiled here. Health care Our health system, of course, is essential in a different way, being on the front lines of the COVID-19 outbreak. Our hero doctors and nurses and other personnel have been treating and saving patients, running clinical trials and testing new therapies, while also taking care of emergency cases. Now our medical center and clinics are returning to normal operations, in phases. You know I am active on Facebook, so I was happy to see this UC Davis Health post about a COVID-19 patient’s release from the medical center on his 81st birthday. Suren Vaniyev had been in the hospital for 50 days, and, during that time, became the first patient to connect with family through the medical center’s new Virtual Visit Program. How great is that? Well before the pandemic, the World Health Organization declared 2020 the Year of the Nurse. How appropriate this has turned out to be. Our health system this week joined the celebration by launching a blog where our nurses can talk about their work in their own words (audio with accompanying transcripts). One of the first participants, Alexandria Depew, talks about a difficult conversation she had with an emergency patient. “That was the last thing he wanted to hear, but him realizing that we were just there to help him and whatever that meant, whatever he needed, whatever that looked like, we were here to help him get through that situation,” Alexandria says. Thank you to our nurses and our doctors and all our health care personnel, at UC Davis Health and our Student Health and Wellness Center, which also continues to provide services (mostly remote) during the pandemic. Assessing students’ learning Our students have also had to adjust to all-remote instruction this quarter. We hope to ease their stress and anxiety with guidance we sent to instructors this week, discouraging them from giving remotely-proctored examinations, which, in being administered at a single, set time, can create significant obstacles and hardships outside of students’ immediate control (for example, students may not have reliable internet, functional computer cameras or microphones; or dependable access to a quiet, private space; or they live in different time zones). “Accordingly, we encourage instructors to assess student learning through means other than proctored exams, such as alternative assignments, oral examinations or unproctored exams,” Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph J. Hexter, Academic Senate Chair Kristin Lagattuta, and Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Education Carolyn Thomas said in a May 5 letter. They also provided recommendations for supporting academic integrity. More information is available on the Keep Teaching website. Summer and fall We are happy to report strong enrollment data for Summer Sessions, which will also be conducted remotely, although some in-person instruction may be permitted in Summer Session II. We’ve had more than 15,000 summer sign-ups to date, a 22 percent gain over last year at this time. (The number of unique enrollments is 10,625; those who sign up for both sessions are counted twice.) Our freshman enrollment so far is strong. We look forward to welcoming the Class of 2024 and our returning students in the fall. We are actively developing scenarios and working with the colleges and schools and programs to support instruction at all levels. The only certainty is that we can have no certainty now, in early May, about what the state of the pandemic will be come late September, when the fall quarter will commence. We also don’t know the mandates and directives from the various entities — the state, county public health officials, and UC itself — that could impact our range of possible options. And, to make planning even more challenging, there is no certainty that whatever conditions and mandates are in place on the first day of the quarter will remain unchanged through the quarter, much less the entire academic year. For all these reasons, while details are still being determined, we will be working with individual departments and professional schools to find ways to offer in-person classes in fall 2020, based, as always, on advice from public health experts. As well, we anticipate that, with few exceptions, course offerings will be available remotely for students who either cannot be accommodated in physical classroom spaces due to the fall health directives or who need to remain isolated due to pre-existing health conditions or other considerations (There are also instructors who will need to teach remotely for the same reasons.)  Thus, we anticipate that our instructional plan will enable substantial flexibility to support student learning and degree progress. Graduation celebrations With spring quarter now half over, we are planning a proper sendoff for the Class of 2020. We had hoped to hold our first outdoor commencements this spring: three large ceremonies for undergraduates from our four colleges, in UC Davis Health Stadium. Instead, we have invited our graduates to participate in an online celebration, on Friday, June 12. Many of our graduate and professional schools are planning remote celebrations as well. We hope to invite our undergraduates back for in-person commencement later this year, and many of our graduate and professional schools are hoping to do the same. Title IX In a message to the campus community earlier this week, I joined UC President Janet Napolitano in expressing deep disappointment with the Department of Education’s new rules on how universities respond to reports of sexual harassment. The rules narrow the definition of sexual harassment and lower the standards to which the federal government holds schools, and subject those who participate in the university’s hearing processes to direct cross-examination, even though other less traumatic and equally fair processes are available. President Napolitano asserted that UC will “continue our hard-won momentum through education, prevention and processes that are fair and compassionate to all parties.” Here at UC Davis, our processes for reporting will not change. Despite this setback, I am committed to a fair and compassionate adjudication process for all. Outreach Our public service also continues. Next Tuesday evening (May 12), the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science and the UC Davis Library will host another program in their Savor series, this time on the subject of “Food Shortages in a Pandemic.” A scheduling conflict prevents Karen Ross, secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, from participating, so Undersecretary Jenny Lester Moffitt will take her place, joining Dan Sumner, director of the UC Agricultural Issues Center, professor of agricultural and resource economics, and former assistant secretary for economics at the U.S. Department of Agriculture; and representatives from Raley’s and the San Francisco produce distributor Veritable Vegetable. The moderator will be Catherine Brinkley, who, as an assistant professor in the Department of Human Ecology at UC Davis, studies the architecture of food supply networks. I will deliver the welcoming remarks. Two days later, on Thursday, May 14, Distinguished Professor Walter Leal will host his second COVID-19 Public Awareness Symposium, on YouTube and Zoom. I gave the welcoming remarks at the first symposium, and we are honored to have UC President Napolitano give the welcoming remarks at next week’s program. Yesterday, we hosted our first UC Davis LIVE: COVID-19, with guests Prasant Mohapatra, vice chancellor for research; Allison Brashear, dean of the School of Medicine; and Michael Lairmore, dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine. You can watch a recording here. Future programs (we are going to have them twice a month) will feature researchers from both sides of the causeway. Good Stuff I’ve mentioned Peter Yellowlees’ Good Stuff newsletter before (he’s our chief wellness officer at UC Davis Health), but, up until now, the psychiatrist’s twice-weekly newsletter was distributed only to health system personnel. Now everyone can read it here, on this new webpage with newsletters dating back to March 12 around the time we started feeling the pandemic. Earlier this week, Professor Yellowlees addressed the question, How does it feel to be an “essential worker?” Other previous topics include coping strategies, surviving at home, and psychological first aid. I highly recommend his Good Stuff. On another helpful front, we have a new way for employees to support other employees who may be dealing with COVID-19 issues or other catastrophic illnesses and events. We have set up a general pool as part of the Catastrophic Leave Program — a pool that anyone can donate to (accrued vacation time only). Employees can still donate vacation time or other paid time off to specific colleagues in distress. But, as of May 1, you can also ask for help from the general pool (up to 24 hours per calendar year). In just over a week, we’ve already seen the pool accumulate 506 hours. Learn more here about eligibility and other requirements. Finally, Happy Mother’s Day to my mom back in St. Louis and to all other UC Davis moms.   Sincerely, Gary S. May Chancellor "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>To the UC Davis Community:</strong></p> <p>Although our main campus is fairly quiet, there is — as you all know — much going on, much that you all are doing. UC Davis is defined as essential in Yolo County’s shelter-in-place order, which states that educational institutions can stay open for the purposes of facilitating distance learning or performing essential functions, provided that we follow social distancing protocol and, more recently, the added requirement for face coverings.</p> <p>We have accordingly significantly modified campus operations, but our mission continues. Our faculty, on short notice, successfully converted to remote examinations for winter quarter and remote instruction for spring quarter. I commend them once again for the work they are doing to connect with their students, and I am also grateful to our IT personnel behind the scenes.</p> <p>As a major research institution, we can never close. We have livestock and agricultural projects to care for on the Davis campus, and extensive facilities to maintain on the Davis and Sacramento campuses. We have clinical services for human and animal health. We have several hundred students living with us in residential housing. Construction continues. <em>For more examples, please take a look at our daily Spring Quarter Snapshots, </em><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/spring-snapshots/"><em>all of which are compiled here</em></a><em>.</em></p> <h2><strong>Health care</strong></h2> <p>Our health system, of course, is essential in a different way, being on the front lines of the COVID-19 outbreak. Our hero doctors and nurses and other personnel have been treating and saving patients, running clinical trials and testing new therapies, while also taking care of emergency cases. Now our medical center and clinics are returning to normal operations, in phases.</p> <p>You know I am active on Facebook, so I was happy to see this UC Davis Health post about a <a href="https://www.facebook.com/UCDavisHealth/photos/a.326339984067136/3253021988065573/?type=3&amp;theater">COVID-19 patient’s release from the medical center</a> on his 81st birthday. Suren Vaniyev had been in the hospital for 50 days, and, during that time, became the <a href="https://health.ucdavis.edu/health-news/newsroom/telemedicine-connects-a-family-during-covid-19-care/2020/05?fbclid=IwAR25GDRQmFfOLN30BnQf9pfIel93ueslwNH2f9B2gSpCxoUraqTEUpymGiE">first patient to connect with family through the medical center’s new Virtual Visit Program</a>. How great is that?</p> <p>Well before the pandemic, the World Health Organization declared 2020 the Year of the Nurse. How appropriate this has turned out to be. Our health system this week joined the celebration by launching <a href="https://health.ucdavis.edu/nurse-stories/index.html">a blog where our nurses can talk about their work</a> in their own words (audio with accompanying transcripts).</p> <p>One of the first participants, Alexandria Depew, talks about a difficult conversation she had with an emergency patient. “That was the last thing he wanted to hear, but him realizing that we were just there to help him and whatever that meant, whatever he needed, whatever that looked like, we were here to help him get through that situation,” Alexandria says.</p> <p>Thank you to our nurses and our doctors and all our health care personnel, at UC Davis Health and our Student Health and Wellness Center, which also continues to provide services (mostly remote) during the pandemic.</p> <h2><strong>Assessing students’ learning</strong></h2> <p>Our students have also had to adjust to all-remote instruction this quarter. We hope to ease their stress and anxiety with <a href="https://academicsenate.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk3876/files/inline-files/final_web_5.5.20.pdf">guidance</a> we sent to instructors this week, discouraging them from giving remotely-proctored examinations, which, in being administered at a single, set time, can create significant obstacles and hardships outside of students’ immediate control (for example, students may not have reliable internet, functional computer cameras or microphones; or dependable access to a quiet, private space; or they live in different time zones).</p> <p>“Accordingly, we encourage instructors to assess student learning through means other than proctored exams, such as alternative assignments, oral examinations or unproctored exams,” Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph J. Hexter, Academic Senate Chair Kristin Lagattuta, and Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Education Carolyn Thomas said in a May 5 letter. They also provided recommendations for supporting academic integrity.</p> <p><em>More information is available on the </em><a href="https://keepteaching.ucdavis.edu/"><em>Keep Teaching website</em></a><em>.</em></p> <h2><strong>Summer and fall</strong></h2> <p>We are happy to report strong enrollment data for <a href="https://summer-sessions.ucdavis.edu/">Summer Sessions</a>, which will also be conducted remotely, although some in-person instruction may be permitted in Summer Session II. We’ve had more than 15,000 summer sign-ups to date, a 22 percent gain over last year at this time. (The number of unique enrollments is 10,625; those who sign up for both sessions are counted twice.)</p> <p>Our freshman enrollment so far is strong. We look forward to welcoming the Class of 2024 and our returning students in the fall. We are actively developing scenarios and working with the colleges and schools and programs to support instruction at all levels. The only certainty is that we can have no certainty now, in early May, about what the state of the pandemic will be come late September, when the fall quarter will commence. We also don’t know the mandates and directives from the various entities — the state, county public health officials, and UC itself — that could impact our range of possible options. And, to make planning even more challenging, there is no certainty that whatever conditions and mandates are in place on the first day of the quarter will remain unchanged through the quarter, much less the entire academic year.</p> <p>For all these reasons, while details are still being determined, we will be working with individual departments and professional schools to find ways to offer in-person classes in fall 2020, based, as always, on advice from public health experts. As well, we anticipate that, with few exceptions, course offerings will be available remotely for students who either cannot be accommodated in physical classroom spaces due to the fall health directives or who need to remain isolated due to pre-existing health conditions or other considerations (There are also instructors who will need to teach remotely for the same reasons.)  Thus, we anticipate that our instructional plan will enable substantial flexibility to support student learning and degree progress.</p> <h2><strong>Graduation celebrations</strong></h2> <p>With spring quarter now half over, we are planning a proper sendoff for the Class of 2020. We had hoped to hold our first outdoor commencements this spring: three large ceremonies for undergraduates from our four colleges, in UC Davis Health Stadium. Instead, we have invited our graduates to participate in an <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/commencement/online-undergraduate-celebration">online celebration, on Friday, June 12</a>. Many of our graduate and professional schools are planning remote celebrations as well.</p> <p>We hope to invite our undergraduates back for in-person commencement later this year, and many of our graduate and professional schools are hoping to do the same.</p> <h2><strong>Title IX</strong></h2> <p>In a <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/chancellors-statement-department-educations-rules-sexual-harassment">message to the campus community</a> earlier this week, I joined UC President Janet Napolitano in expressing deep disappointment with the Department of Education’s new rules on how universities respond to reports of sexual harassment.</p> <p>The rules narrow the definition of sexual harassment and lower the standards to which the federal government holds schools, and subject those who participate in the university’s hearing processes to direct cross-examination, even though other less traumatic and equally fair processes are available.</p> <p>President Napolitano asserted that UC will “continue our hard-won momentum through education, prevention and processes that are fair and compassionate to all parties.” Here at UC Davis, our processes for reporting will not change. Despite this setback, I am committed to a fair and compassionate adjudication process for all.</p> <h2><strong>Outreach</strong></h2> <p>Our public service also continues. Next Tuesday evening (May 12), the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science and the UC Davis Library will host another program in their Savor series, this time on the subject of <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/undersecretary-replaces-ross-discussion-about-covid-19-impacts-food-supply-chain">“Food Shortages in a Pandemic.”</a></p> <p>A scheduling conflict prevents Karen Ross, secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, from participating, so Undersecretary Jenny Lester Moffitt will take her place, joining Dan Sumner, director of the UC Agricultural Issues Center, professor of agricultural and resource economics, and former assistant secretary for economics at the U.S. Department of Agriculture; and representatives from Raley’s and the San Francisco produce distributor Veritable Vegetable. The moderator will be Catherine Brinkley,<strong> </strong>who, as an assistant professor in the Department of Human Ecology at UC Davis, studies the architecture of food supply networks. I will deliver the welcoming remarks.</p> <p>Two days later, on Thursday, May 14, Distinguished Professor Walter Leal will host his second <a href="https://ucanr.edu/blogs/blogcore/postdetail.cfm?postnum=41414">COVID-19 Public Awareness Symposium</a>, on YouTube and Zoom. I gave the welcoming remarks at the first symposium, and we are honored to have UC President Napolitano give the welcoming remarks at next week’s program.</p> <p>Yesterday, we hosted our first UC Davis LIVE: COVID-19, with guests Prasant Mohapatra, vice chancellor for research; Allison Brashear, dean of the School of Medicine; and Michael Lairmore, dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5s_77N7jtM">You can watch a recording here.</a> Future programs (we are going to have them twice a month) will feature researchers from both sides of the causeway.</p> <h2><strong>Good Stuff</strong></h2> <p>I’ve mentioned Peter Yellowlees’ Good Stuff newsletter before (he’s our chief wellness officer at UC Davis Health), but, up until now, the psychiatrist’s twice-weekly newsletter was distributed only to health system personnel. <a href="https://health.ucdavis.edu/clinician-health-and-well-being/Program/Good-Stuff-Newsletters.html">Now everyone can read it here, on this new webpage</a> with newsletters dating back to March 12 around the time we started feeling the pandemic. Earlier this week, Professor Yellowlees addressed the question, How does it feel to be an “essential worker?” Other previous topics include coping strategies, surviving at home, and psychological first aid. I highly recommend his Good Stuff.</p> <p>On another helpful front, we have a new way for employees to support other employees who may be dealing with COVID-19 issues or other catastrophic illnesses and events. We have set up a general pool as part of the Catastrophic Leave Program — a pool that anyone can donate to (accrued vacation time only).</p> <p>Employees can still donate vacation time or other paid time off to specific colleagues in distress. But, as of May 1, you can also ask for help from the general pool (up to 24 hours per calendar year). In just over a week, we’ve already seen the pool accumulate 506 hours. <a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/employees/leave-time-off/catastrophic"><em>Learn more here about eligibility and other requirements.</em></a></p> <p>Finally, Happy Mother’s Day to my mom back in St. Louis and to all other UC Davis moms.</p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 74.946%"><iframe width="459" height="344" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jJyo-obOcWo?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p><strong>Sincerely,</strong></p> <p><strong>Gary S. May</strong><br /> Chancellor</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/chancellor-videos" hreflang="en">Chancellor&#039;s Videos</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 08 May 2020 22:33:19 +0000 Gary S. May 2511 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu Statement on Harmful Federal Sexual Harassment Rules https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/statement-on-harmful-federal-sexual-harassment-rules <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Statement on Harmful Federal Sexual Harassment Rules</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 06, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/20190821-chancellor-uc-davis-33.jpg?h=84a21fff&amp;itok=Io-ScLtH" width="1280" height="720" alt="Chancellor Gary May with serious expression on his face and right hand on chin looking out a window." typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description="To the UC Davis Community: Today, the Department of Education issued new rules that will significantly impact how UC Davis and other universities respond to reports of sexual harassment. These rules narrow the definition of sexual harassment and lower the standards to which the federal government holds schools. They also subject those who participate in the university’s hearing processes for resolving such reports to direct cross-examination, even though other less traumatic and equally fair processes are available. These changes are a big step backwards and I am concerned they might discourage survivors from coming forward in the future. I join University of California President Janet Napolitano in expressing my deep disappointment with the Department of Education’s action. The safety and well-being of our UC Davis community is my top priority. I want to assure you that we will continue to respond promptly and effectively to allegations of sexual assault, dating and domestic violence, stalking and other forms of sexual harassment. In a statement issued today, President Napolitano said some of the changes were “deeply troubling” and asserted that the UC will “continue our hard-won momentum through education, prevention, and processes that are fair and compassionate to all parties.” Our UC Davis processes for reporting will not change. To make a report about sexual violence or sexual harassment, you can contact our Title IX officer directly at 530-752-9466 or wjdelmendo@ucdavis.edu or the Harassment and Discrimination Assistance and Prevention Program (HDAPP) at 530-747-3864. The Center for Advocacy, Resources and Education (CARE) also offers confidential resources for any student, faculty or staff who have experienced sexual violence or sexual harassment. Additional resources are available at sexualviolence.ucdavis.edu. To learn more about how UC Davis handles sexual violence and sexual harassment cases, read the Compliance Annual Report. UC Davis will never relent in the fight against sexual violence. Despite this setback, I am committed to a fair and compassionate adjudication process for all. Sincerely, Gary S. May Chancellor "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="Body"><strong><span><span><span><span>To the UC Davis Community: </span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p class="Body"><span><span><span><span>Today, the Department of Education issued new rules that will significantly impact how UC Davis and other universities respond to reports of sexual harassment. These rules narrow the definition of sexual harassment and lower the standards to which the federal government holds schools. They also subject those who participate in the university’s hearing processes for resolving such reports to direct cross-examination, even though other less traumatic and equally fair processes are available.</span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Body"><span><span><span><span>These changes are a big step backwards and I am concerned they might discourage survivors from coming forward in the future. I join University of California President Janet Napolitano in expressing my deep disappointment with the Department of Education’s action. </span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Body"><span><span><span><span><span>The safety and well-being of our UC Davis community is my top priority. I want to assure you that we will continue to respond promptly and effectively to allegations of sexual assault, dating and domestic violence, stalking and other forms of sexual harassment.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Body"><span><span><span><span>In a </span><a href="https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/press-room/uc-undeterred-despite-harmful-federal-sexual-harassment-rules-0"><span><span><span>statement issued today</span></span></span></a><span>, President Napolitano said some of the changes were “deeply troubling” and asserted that the UC will “continue our hard-won momentum through education, prevention, and processes that are fair and compassionate to all parties.”</span></span></span></span></p> <p class="Body"><span><span><span><span><span>Our UC Davis processes for reporting will not change. To make a report about sexual violence or sexual harassment,</span> <span>you can contact our Title IX officer directly at 530-752-9466 or </span><a href="mailto:wjdelmendo@ucdavis.edu"><span><span><span>wjdelmendo@ucdavis.edu</span></span></span></a> <span>or the </span><a href="http://hdapp.ucdavis.edu/index.html"><span><span><span>Harassment and Discrimination Assistance and Prevention Program</span></span></span></a> <span>(HDAPP) at 530-747-3864. The </span><a href="http://care.ucdavis.edu/"><span><span><span>Center for Advocacy, Resources and Education</span></span></span></a><span><span> (CARE) </span></span><span>also offers confidential resources for any student, faculty or staff who have experienced sexual violence or sexual harassment. Additional resources are available at </span><a href="http://sexualviolence.ucdavis.edu/"><span><span><span>sexualviolence.ucdavis.edu</span></span></span></a><span><span>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>To learn more about how UC Davis handles sexual violence and sexual harassment cases, read the </span><a href="https://compliance.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk5096/files/inline-files/Compliance%2520and%2520Policy%2520annual%2520report%252018-19.pdf"><span><span><span>Compliance Annual Report</span></span></span></a><span><span>. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>UC Davis will never relent in the fight against sexual violence. Despite this setback, I am committed to a fair and compassionate adjudication process for all.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><strong>Sincerely,</strong></p> <p><strong>Gary S. May</strong><br /> Chancellor</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 07 May 2020 01:13:55 +0000 Gary S. May 2506 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu Checking In With Chancellor May: Signs of Hope https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/checking-in-with-chancellor-may-signs-of-hope <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Checking In With Chancellor May: Signs of Hope</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">May 01, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/chancellor-gary-s-may-writing-desk_3.jpg?h=0981b719&amp;itok=38P-ypuD" width="1280" height="720" alt="Chancellor May sitting at desk writing a letter" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description=" To the UC Davis Community: Shelter-in-place orders have been extended to May 22 in Sacramento County and May 31 in Yolo County, and, while some of you may be having a difficult time seeing any hint of a silver lining in the coronavirus cloud, I see signs of hope all around. With revised public health orders, our health system is working to fully restore services within the next week for both the medical center and health care clinics around the region. (As a side note, the Emergency Department reports that it has been seeing more cases of delayed care — and hospital officials are urging people not to wait, that if they are worried about COVID-19 at the hospital, they needn’t be. Watch this video to see the many steps being taken to reassure people they are safe in seeking care at UC Davis Health.) Our veterinary hospital will start a similar, phased resumption of regular services this coming Monday (May 4). Some veterinary clinical services will initially be more available than others, and priority will still be given to more urgent cases as well as to existing clients. Our research enterprise has guidelines in place to ramp back up. And we have our two Scenario Planning Groups at work, one dealing with instruction, the other with operations. In addition, the campus is participating in making recommendations as Yolo County develops its plan for reopening. Three UC Davis officials — Eric Kvigne, associate vice chancellor for Safety Services; Mabel Salon, chief government and community relations officer; and Matt Dulcich, local government relations manager — serve on a stakeholders’ team, along with city and county and other representatives, to assist in implementing the county’s Roadmap to Recovery. Further, in letters we sent to the leadership of both Yolo and Sacramento counties, we offered our campus’s technical and academic expertise as both counties develop plans and strategies for reopening regional business and other activities.  In more good news, we are bringing blood drives back to campus. We have arranged for four collection days on the Davis campus, Thursday-Friday, May 21-22 and 28-29, for UC Davis affiliates and the community at large. Appointments are being taken now. And let’s not forget our grounds crew, back at work — with face coverings on — restoring our landscape to its usual pristine condition. Thank you, grounds crew. Testing a vaccine and plasma More reason for hope: Today (May 1), UC Davis and Verndari Inc. began preclinical testing of a COVID-19 vaccine. It’s happening in our Mouse Biology Program, where researchers amended an existing protocol for influenza to allow for testing of the COVID-19 vaccine in an established rodent model. It will quickly provide the data we need before we can move into larger species, such as nonhuman primates, and human clinical trials. Not only that, but the project involves a new delivery system, a VaxiPatch, in which an array of microneedles delivers the vaccine into your arm. The technology eliminates the need for refrigeration, facilitates high-volume, automated manufacturing of vaccines and can potentially be self-administered — all very important if we want to get this out to the public as fast as possible. Human Health Sciences Vice Chancellor David Lubarsky rightly noted, “This is exactly the type of combined business and academic effort our university excels at delivering. ... By working together with us at UC Davis, we can potentially help to address this global pandemic sooner rather than later.” In other COVID-19 research news: Transfusions — UC Davis Health reported it had, for the first time, transfused blood from a recovered COVID-19 patient, into two other patients, in an effort to boost their ability to neutralize the virus and its devastating effects. Antibodies — The health system implemented an accurate blood test to identify people who may have developed antibodies against the virus. The test is available to some UC Davis health care workers on a voluntary basis, and is expected to be available to other health care workers and the community in several weeks. Davis-Sacramento connections The connections between our Davis and Sacramento campuses are only growing stronger, in research and other ways. A surgeon, Andrew Li, and a biomedical engineer, Tingrui Pan, for example, have come up with a prototype for a simple, inexpensive ventilator that uses microfluidics instead of mechanical parts. I am also happy to report that 40 of our Davis campus custodians volunteered to temporarily transfer to the Sacramento campus. They’re working in public areas as well as patient areas: emergency, exam and trauma. Thank you for stepping up. And speaking of connections, our new Causeway Connection bus service starts Monday, on a reduced schedule during the pandemic, but still a cause for celebration as we launch a new fleet of all-electric buses, serving not only UC Davis affiliates but the public, carrying people between UC Davis Health and the Davis campus. Technology for good and evil Our faculty, staff and students continue to make excellent use of technology during spring quarter — big shout-out to all of our IT professionals who are assisting to keep people connected up and down the state, across the country and around the world. Good news: We hesitated to call off our Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities Conference, and, now we are happy to report it will proceed virtually, Thursday-Friday, May 7-8, with more than 500 participants. I know I will be watching (and I’ll have to register like everyone else, by noon Wednesday, May 6). Bad news: Zoombombing is real. In an April 10 letter posted here, Minming Wu Morri, campus privacy officer, and Cheryl Washington, chief information security officer, answered the question, What can you do? “Ensure that you are using the latest version of Zoom and that you are enabling the newest Zoom privacy and security features, described here and in our Zoom Privacy and Security FAQs. These features are user-controlled and must be turned on.” Relief funds, summer programs We are happy to report today that emergency relief payments related to the pandemic will be going out soon to undergraduates and graduate and professional school students with financial need. We are grateful to provide this support to a large portion of our student population, using CARES Act funds from the federal government and supplemental funds from campus. And while the Department of Education prohibited the distribution of CARES Act money to DACA students, please know UC Davis and all UC campuses will use their own funding to assist DACA students in need. Please see my letter from earlier this week in (continued) support of our DACA students. As summer nears, we have new guidance for instructors of Summer Session courses and directors of other campus-based summer programs. We announced April 10 that instruction in both Summer Sessions will be remote, though, if health directives change, some in-person laboratory courses may be possible in Summer Session II. In addition, uncertainty about how and when Yolo County Public Health guidance may change leads us to suggest that other campus-based summer programs should plan to be remote if possible. We now have a process set up whereby instructors and program directors can seek approval for in-person instruction or program delivery, for instances in which program goals cannot be met without it, and when the instructor believes the program can be conducted in-person in accordance with then-current public health guidance. Please contact Risk Management Services to start the process, which will need final approval by the appropriate vice chancellor, or the provost and executive vice chancellor. Walk the talk As we enter our seventh week of shelter-in-place, please don’t forget about getting some exercise. And be sure to participate in the 11th annual UC Walks, a virtual event this year, from Sunday to Sunday, May 3-10. Everything counts, not just walking! Do Zumba in your living room or any other workout you like to do — whatever gets you moving! Learn more and register here, then report back after you put in at least 30 minutes of exercise. In return, you’ll get a T-shirt (while supplies last), and have a chance to win prizes (including a FitBit). So, that’s one thing you can do during shelter-in-place. Here’s another idea:  “Attend” theCalifornia Raptor Center’s annual spring open house, to be held virtually, tomorrow (May 2). Or, how about if I read to you and your children? Sacramento City Councilwoman Angelique Ashby invited me to participate in “Storytime Sacramento,” and, if you go to the website, you can find the video recording of me reading Ice Is Nice! from The Cat in the Hat’s Learning Library, a book about the North and South poles, and climate change.You’ll find my story in Chapter 2. Whatever you do with your family, please remember, hope is all around. Sincerely, Gary S. MayChancellor "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div> <p>To the UC Davis Community:</p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Shelter-in-place orders have been extended to May 22 in Sacramento County and May 31 in Yolo County, and, while some of you may be having a difficult time seeing any hint of a silver lining in the coronavirus cloud, I see signs of hope all around.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>With revised public health orders, our health system is working to fully restore services within the next week for both the medical center and health care clinics around the region. (As a side note, the Emergency Department reports that it has been seeing more cases of delayed care — and hospital officials are urging people not to wait, that if they are worried about COVID-19 at the hospital, they needn’t be. Watch <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqL5lJuE5eo&amp;feature=youtu.be">this video</a> to see the many steps being taken to reassure people they are safe in seeking care at UC Davis Health.)</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Our veterinary hospital will start a similar, phased resumption of regular services this coming Monday (May 4). Some veterinary clinical services will initially be more available than others, and priority will still be given to more urgent cases as well as to existing clients.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Our <a href="https://research.ucdavis.edu/guidelines-for-uc-davis-research-ramp-up-ramp-down-april-23-2020">research enterprise has guidelines</a> in place to ramp back up. And we have our two Scenario Planning Groups at work, one dealing with instruction, the other with operations.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In addition, the campus is participating in making recommendations as Yolo County develops its plan for reopening. Three UC Davis officials — Eric Kvigne, associate vice chancellor for Safety Services; Mabel Salon, chief government and community relations officer; and Matt Dulcich, local government relations manager — serve on a stakeholders’ team, along with city and county and other representatives, to assist in implementing the county’s Roadmap to Recovery.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Further, in letters we sent to the leadership of both Yolo and Sacramento counties, we offered our campus’s technical and academic expertise as both counties develop plans and strategies for reopening regional business and other activities. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In more good news, we are bringing blood drives back to campus. We have arranged for four collection days on the Davis campus, Thursday-Friday, May 21-22 and 28-29, for UC Davis affiliates and the community at large. <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/blood-drives-campus-may-21-22-28-29">Appointments are being taken now.</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>And let’s not forget our grounds crew, back at work — with face coverings on — restoring our landscape to its usual pristine condition. Thank you, grounds crew.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><strong><span><span>Testing a vaccine and plasma</span></span></strong></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>More reason for hope: Today (May 1), UC Davis and Verndari Inc. began <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/covid-19-vaccine-patch-delivery-technology-enters-preclinical-testing-uc-davis">preclinical testing of a COVID-19 vaccine</a>. It’s happening in our Mouse Biology Program, where researchers amended an existing protocol for influenza to allow for testing of the COVID-19 vaccine in an established rodent model. It will quickly provide the data we need before we can move into larger species, such as nonhuman primates, and human clinical trials.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Not only that, but the project involves a new delivery system, a VaxiPatch, in which an array of microneedles delivers the vaccine into your arm. The technology eliminates the need for refrigeration, facilitates high-volume, automated manufacturing of vaccines and can potentially be self-administered — all very important if we want to get this out to the public as fast as possible.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Human Health Sciences Vice Chancellor David Lubarsky rightly noted, “This is exactly the type of combined business and academic effort our university excels at delivering. ... By working together with us at UC Davis, we can potentially help to address this global pandemic sooner rather than later.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In other COVID-19 research news:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <div> <ul class="list--arrow" type="disc"><li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Transfusions</span></span></span></strong><span><span><span> — UC Davis Health reported it had, for the first time, <a href="https://health.ucdavis.edu/health-news/newsroom/uc-davis-health-conducts-first-plasma-transfusions-for-covid-19/2020/04">transfused blood from a recovered COVID-19 patient, into two other patients</a>, in an effort to boost their ability to neutralize the virus and its devastating effects.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Antibodies — </span></span></span></strong><span><span><span>The health system implemented an <a href="https://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2020/05/01/uc-davis-health-begins-covid-19antibody-testing.html">accurate blood test to identify people who may have developed antibodies against the virus</a>. The test is available to some UC Davis health care workers on a voluntary basis, and is expected to be available to other health care workers and the community in several weeks.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></div> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Davis-Sacramento connections</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The connections between our Davis and Sacramento campuses are only growing stronger, in research and other ways.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>A surgeon, Andrew Li, and a biomedical engineer, Tingrui Pan, for example, have come up with a <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/uc-davis-engineers-clinician-develop-low-cost-portable-ventilator">prototype for a simple, inexpensive ventilator</a> that uses microfluidics instead of mechanical parts.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I am also happy to report that 40 of our Davis campus custodians volunteered to temporarily transfer to the Sacramento campus. They’re working in public areas as well as patient areas: emergency, exam and trauma. Thank you for stepping up. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>And speaking of connections, our new <a href="https://foa.ucdavis.edu/news/causeway-connection-run-may-4">Causeway Connection bus service</a> starts Monday, on a reduced schedule during the pandemic, but still a cause for celebration as we launch a new fleet of all-electric buses, serving not only UC Davis affiliates but the public, carrying people between UC Davis Health and the Davis campus.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><strong><span><span>Technology for good and evil</span></span></strong></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Our faculty, staff and students continue to make excellent use of technology during spring quarter — big shout-out to all of our IT professionals who are assisting to keep people connected up and down the state, across the country and around the world.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Good news: We hesitated to call off our <a href="https://urc.ucdavis.edu/conference">Undergraduate Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities Conference</a>, and, now we are happy to report it will proceed virtually, Thursday-Friday, May 7-8, with more than 500 participants. I know I will be watching (and I’ll have to <a href="https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScquPToF9RarlGU8FLJfzmKKjw9meVy74SmwzJOd3JRYyaFDA/viewform">register</a> like everyone else, by noon Wednesday, May 6).</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Bad news: Zoombombing is real. In an <a href="https://keepteaching.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk8756/files/files/page/Zoom%20Joint%20Letter_4.10.20.pdf">April 10 letter posted here</a>, Minming Wu Morri, campus privacy officer, and Cheryl Washington, chief information security officer, answered the question, What can you do? “Ensure that you are using the latest version of Zoom and that you are enabling the newest Zoom privacy and security features, described here and in our <a href="https://keepteaching.ucdavis.edu/faq-zoom-privacy-and-security-uc-davis">Zoom Privacy and Security FAQs</a>. <strong><span>These features are user-controlled and must be turned on.</span></strong>”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Relief funds, summer programs</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>We are happy to report today that emergency relief payments related to the pandemic will be going out soon to undergraduates and graduate and professional school students with financial need. We are grateful to provide this support to a large portion of our student population, using CARES Act funds from the federal government and supplemental funds from campus.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>And while the Department of Education prohibited the distribution of CARES Act money to DACA students, please know UC Davis and all UC campuses will use their own funding to assist DACA students in need. <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/chancellor-uc-davis-committed-our-undocumented-community">Please see my letter from earlier this week in (continued) support of our DACA students.</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>As summer nears, we have new guidance for instructors of Summer Session courses and directors of other campus-based summer programs. We announced April 10 that instruction in both <a href="https://summer-sessions.ucdavis.edu/">Summer Sessions</a> will be remote, though, if health directives change, some in-person laboratory courses may be possible in Summer Session II. In addition, uncertainty about how and when Yolo County Public Health guidance may change leads us to suggest that other campus-based summer programs should plan to be remote if possible.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>We now have a process set up whereby instructors and program directors can seek approval for in-person instruction or program delivery, for instances in which program goals cannot be met without it, and when the instructor believes the program can be conducted in-person in accordance with then-current public health guidance. <a href="https://safetyservices.ucdavis.edu/units/risk-management-services">Please contact Risk Management Services</a> to start the process, which will need final approval by the appropriate vice chancellor, or the provost and executive vice chancellor.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Walk the talk</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>As we enter our seventh week of shelter-in-place, please don’t forget about getting some exercise. And be sure to participate in the 11th annual UC Walks, a virtual event this year, from Sunday to Sunday, May 3-10. Everything counts, not just walking! Do Zumba in your living room or any other workout you like to do — whatever gets you moving! <a href="https://safetyservices.ucdavis.edu/units/occupational-health/health-well-being/events/uc-walks">Learn more and register here</a>, then report back after you put in at least 30 minutes of exercise. In return, you’ll get a T-shirt (while supplies last), and have a chance to win prizes (including a FitBit).</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>So, that’s one thing you can do during shelter-in-place. Here’s another idea:  “Attend” the<a href="https://crc.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/">California Raptor Center’s annual spring open house</a>, to be held virtually, tomorrow (May 2).</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Or, how about if I read to you and your children? Sacramento City Councilwoman Angelique Ashby invited me to participate in “Storytime Sacramento,” and, if you go to the website, you can find the video recording of me reading <em><span>Ice Is Nice!</span></em> from The Cat in the Hat’s Learning Library, a book about the North and South poles, and climate change.<a href="https://www.angeliqueashby.com/copy-of-chapter-one">You’ll find my story in Chapter 2.</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> <div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Whatever you do with your family, please remember, hope is all around.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 74.946%"><iframe width="459" height="344" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/T-876k5655M?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p><strong>Sincerely,<br /> Gary S. May</strong><br /><em>Chancellor</em></p> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/chancellor-videos" hreflang="en">Chancellor&#039;s Videos</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 01 May 2020 22:50:19 +0000 Gary S. May 2501 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu UC Davis Is Committed to Our Undocumented Community https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/uc-davis-is-committed-to-our-undocumented-community <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">UC Davis Is Committed to Our Undocumented Community</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">April 28, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/IMG_0072.JPG?h=d2093c6b&amp;itok=k2G30Gi6" width="1280" height="720" alt="Chancellor Gary May looks into the camera smiling, holding a dry erase board that says, &quot;I stand with undocumented students because they deserve justice and the opportunities all Americans enjoy&quot;." typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description="To the UC Davis Community: In these unprecedented times of the COVID-19 pandemic, everyone in our campus community is dealing with a certain amount of stress and uncertainty. Many in our community are experiencing another level of uncertainty as we await the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. I want to assure you that UC Davis remains committed to supporting our undocumented community, no matter the outcome of this decision. Rescinding the DACA program runs counter to the University of California principles of open and equal access to higher education for students of all backgrounds. I personally spoke on behalf of our undocumented community at a Capitol Hill news conference with members of Congress and academic leaders in October 2017. I also called on Congress to pass bipartisan legislation that would provide a pathway to citizenship for our students UC Davis is home to a dedicated community of DACA/DACAmented students and staff from across the globe. UC Davis graduates who were protected from deportation under DACA have blossomed with careers in medicine, law, social work and much more. These students — many of whom are the first in their families to attend college — contribute to our rich diversity of cultures and perspectives that is integral to our success as a global university. They are paving a future for themselves and their families so they can give back to our society. We have campus resources to help guide DACA/DACAmented and undocumented students through their financial, legal and even emotional challenges. Our AB 540 and Undocumented Student Center is a model of empowerment, opportunity and equity. During this critical time, the center provides a sense of community and solidarity. Students can find assistance with renewing DACA status, as well as a variety of resources to assist with housing, finances and other needs. Student Health and Counseling Services (SHCS) provides a wide variety of medical, mental health and wellness services to all registered UC Davis students regardless of immigration status or insurance coverage. We will provide more information after the Supreme Court issues its decision on DACA. In the meantime, I ask that everyone be mindful of the uncertainty facing our undocumented and DACA/DACAmented students. Be kind to one another and share these resources with those in need. Let’s continue to build and nurture the outstanding Aggie community each of us knows and deserves. Sincerely, Gary S. May Chancellor "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>To the UC Davis Community:</strong></p> <p>In these unprecedented times of the COVID-19 pandemic, everyone in our campus community is dealing with a certain amount of stress and uncertainty.</p> <p>Many in our community are experiencing another level of uncertainty as we await the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.</p> <p>I want to assure you that UC Davis remains committed to supporting our undocumented community, no matter the outcome of this decision.</p> <p>Rescinding the DACA program runs counter to the <a href="http://undoc.universityofcalifornia.edu/files/uc-principles-in-support-of-undocumented-members-of-the-uc-community.pdf">University of California principles of open and equal access to higher education for students of <em>all</em> backgrounds</a>.</p> <p>I personally spoke on behalf of our undocumented community at a Capitol Hill news conference with members of Congress and academic leaders in October 2017. I also called on Congress to pass bipartisan legislation that would provide a pathway to citizenship for our students</p> <p>UC Davis is home to a dedicated community of DACA/DACAmented students and staff from across the globe. UC Davis graduates who were protected from deportation under DACA have blossomed with careers in medicine, law, social work and much more.</p> <p>These students — many of whom are the first in their families to attend college — contribute to our rich diversity of cultures and perspectives that is integral to our success as a global university. They are paving a future for themselves and their families so they can give back to our society.</p> <p>We have campus resources to help guide DACA/DACAmented and undocumented students through their financial, legal and even emotional challenges.</p> <p>Our <a href="https://undocumented.ucdavis.edu/">AB 540 and Undocumented Student Center</a> is a model of empowerment, opportunity and equity. During this critical time, the center provides a sense of community and solidarity. Students can find assistance with renewing DACA status, as well as a variety of resources to assist with housing, finances and other needs.</p> <p><a href="https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/">Student Health and Counseling Services (SHCS)</a> provides a wide variety of medical, mental health and wellness services to all registered UC Davis students regardless of immigration status or insurance coverage.</p> <p>We will provide more information after the Supreme Court issues its decision on DACA. In the meantime, I ask that everyone be mindful of the uncertainty facing our undocumented and DACA/DACAmented students. Be kind to one another and share these resources with those in need. Let’s continue to build and nurture the outstanding Aggie community each of us knows and deserves.</p> <p><strong>Sincerely,</strong></p> <p><strong>Gary S. May</strong><br /> Chancellor</p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 29 Apr 2020 01:09:55 +0000 Gary S. May 2491 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu Checking In With Chancellor May: Teamwork https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/news/messages/chancellor-messages/checking-in-with-chancellor-may-teamwork <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Checking In With Chancellor May: Teamwork</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/3486" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Gary S. May</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">April 24, 2020</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1166/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/11_7_2019_Chancell-ing%20Photo_1.jpg?h=1a2aa1db&amp;itok=PEYBzwlD" width="1280" height="720" alt="Photo of Chancellor Gary May looking at the camera and smiling with his right had on his face" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://leadership.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent News" addthis:description="To the UC Davis Community:  This week we observed the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, and it has me thinking even more about the good work we do at UC Davis to protect the health of our land, air, water and animals, and of the 7.5 billion people who inhabit our planet. We have been No. 1 in the nation in the GreenMetric World University Rankings for three years running, and our health system recently received an Environmental Excellence Award from Practice Greenhealth. We are equally proud of our John Muir Institute of the Environment, the SeaDoc Society, the Tahoe Environmental Research Center and so much more. Our research has slowed in this field, necessarily, but we are more than making up for it in COVID-19 research. We had no shortage of proposals for campus funding, and gave out our second and final set of awards this week. Our Office of Research asked for proposals across all disciplines, and that’s what we have in projects like “Novel Bisaminoquinoline Derived Self-Delivered Nanodrug Against SARS-CoV-2,” by Yuanpei Li, associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; and “‘Immunity Passport’: New Forms of Biological Citizenship Post-COVID-19,” by Cristiana Giordano, associate professor in the Department of Anthropology. This week, our Center for Healthcare Policy and Research, in collaboration with the Center for Health and Technology and the Behavioral Health Center of Excellence, called for proposals related to COVID-19’s impact on health services, access, outcomes and costs. Yesterday, Distinguished Professor Walter Leal brought together a panel of UC Davis experts and others for a public awareness symposium that drew a capacity audience of 500 on Zoom, with participants from around the world — not counting hundreds more who could not get in. The symposium had 647 real-time viewers on YouTube — and the recording now has more 1,600 views. Thank you, Professor Leal and panelists. (Look for a report in Tuesday’s Dateline UC Davis.) Essential care In Sacramento, UC Davis Health continues to do brilliant work in testing and research, and, of course, treatment. Here’s a wonderful story about the festive farewell our health care team gave to a patient as she left the hospital. Beyond COVID-19, our health care team is continuing to provide essential patient care, including cancer surgeries, organ transplants and supporting the region’s trauma care needs — truly extraordinary in light of all that is happening. We thank our health care heroes. (The Washington Post spent a whole day here last week, and you can see a video report here, if you’re a subscriber.) Departments and students have been helping where they can, donating personal protective equipment and making face shields, for example, delivering hundreds of them this week and last to our medical center. The Academic and Staff Assistance Program, or ASAP, which provides high quality, confidential counseling for faculty and staff at UC Davis and UC Davis Health, is offering its services virtually, and holding presentations and discussions on a number of topics, as well as drop-in support groups. For more information, call Davis ASAP, 530-752-2727, or UC Davis Health ASAP, 916-734-2727. We have a truly outstanding team on both of our campuses and beyond, a point recognized earlier this week in a “Twitter Roadblock” — when our coaches joined their counterparts around the country in tweeting their support for their academic and health colleagues “as they take the fight to COVID-19 in our labs and hospitals.” They used the hashtag #ProudToBeOnTheirTeam — and if you look it up, you’ll see the tweets from this amazing show of support. Face coverings This morning, Yolo County issued an order requiring people to wear face coverings outside the home, including at work. Our groundskeepers, first-responders and health care workers have already been wearing masks and face coverings at work. If you are required to be on campus to work, please bring your own face covering to wear. Most of you will already have them for your essential trips out of the house. For employees who do not have suitable face coverings available for their on-campus assignments, we will have details soon about how to request them. As you might expect, orders for face coverings, including nonmedical masks, are in high demand. We have a limited supply on hand and have placed additional orders for expected delivery in June. The county order is effective immediately but not enforceable until 8 a.m. Monday, April 27. Please remember: Although wearing a face covering is one tool for reducing the spread of the virus, doing so is not a substitute for sheltering in place, physical distancing of at least 6 feet, and frequent hand-washing. Planning scenarios I told you last week about two Scenario Planning Groups that we’ve established to prepare the campus for a resumption of activities, subject, of course, to evolving conditions and medical guidance as well as county, state and federal directives. Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph Hexter leads one of these groups, focusing on instruction for the fall quarter; while Vice Chancellor Kelly Ratliff of Finance, Operations and Administration leads the other, focusing on operations. These groups will coordinate with the Office of Research, which has posted guidelines for ramping up research — but please note, and this is important: We are not there yet. This is preparation. We remain in Phase 1, sheltering in place in adherence to government directives, with only critical research allowed. Phase 2 allows time-sensitive research activities (with only a third of research personnel allowed on-site at any time). Phase 3 provides for a gradual restart, with two-thirds of research personnel allowed on-site at any time. In Phase 4, we would return to full research operations. (The guidelines can also be used in reverse, to ramp down research.) The guidance includes principles that must be followed. They include the following: Protect the mental and physical health and safety of the research work force, clinical patients and human research subjects; no researcher should feel they are being compelled to work on campus or in the field during periods of shelter-at-home directives; safe practices within laboratories must be rigorously maintained, with adequate access to PPE and other safety related supplies; and the number of people in a workspace must be limited, to allow for proper social distancing. Federal aid You may have heard that the federal government’s $2 trillion CARES Act provided direct funding to lessen the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on students and institutions of higher education. UC Davis expects to receive almost $34 million. Half, almost $17 million, will be used to provide direct financial support to students for increased needs related to the coronavirus. Financial Aid professionals at UC Davis and across UC are developing plans to distribute these funds to students, with the vast majority of funds expected to be awarded this quarter. The remaining $17 million will be used to address the operational impact of COVID-19 on the campus. This level of funding, while helpful, will meet only a small portion of the campus need: Last month alone, we experienced unanticipated expenditures and losses of $80 million. Campus leaders are developing guiding principles for allocation of our CARES Act funds. The U.S. Department of Education is expected to issue additional guidance and rules about the acceptable use and timeline for these funds, which will impact campus decisions. We did some fundraising of our own last weekend during our fourth annual Give Day. We were a bit wary of going forward with this event during the pandemic, but ultimately decided our needs are too great — especially our emergency funds, new and old, that are providing COVID-19 relief to our students and front-line workers. Not only did people respond, but they did so in a record way — contributing more than $2.5 million to funds and programs all across the university, including $200,000 for those emergency funds I mentioned. Earth Day and beyond Before this pandemic, our Office of Sustainability had organized more than a month of activities to celebrate the 50th Earth Day. I want to thank everyone who pivoted quickly to move as many of those events online as possible. The calendar on ourEarth Day website includes a World Climate Simulation next week (a program that can complement student learning in classes addressing climate change) and avirtual tour of our California Raptor Center on May 2. Another Earth Day project is 50/50/50, in which we are all invited to submit essays, poems, artworks, posters, short films and music reflecting our thoughts about Earth Day when it began 50 years ago (those of us who are old enough to remember); our feelings today, on the 50th anniversary; and our vision for 50 years hence. Submit by email to sustainability@ucdavis.edu, and the team will assemble everything in a gallery on the Earth Day website. I am heartened at a time like this to know we are in this together, taking care of one another and our planet (including the peregrine falcons who are the stars of a webcam show from their nest atop the UC Davis Medical Center — be sure to check it out!). Sincerely, Gary S. MayChancellor "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <a class="addthis_button_linkedin"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: " " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>To the UC Davis Community: </p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>This week we observed the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, and it has me thinking even more about the good work we do at UC Davis to protect the health of our land, air, water and animals, and of the 7.5 billion people who inhabit our planet.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>We have been No. 1 in the nation in the GreenMetric World University Rankings for three years running, and our health system recently received an Environmental Excellence Award from Practice Greenhealth. We are equally proud of our John Muir Institute of the Environment, the SeaDoc Society, the Tahoe Environmental Research Center and so much more. Our research has slowed in this field, necessarily, but we are more than making up for it in COVID-19 research. We had no shortage of proposals for campus funding, and gave out our <a href="https://covid19research.ucdavis.edu/news/final-round-competitive-grants-awarded-fight-covid-19"><span>second and final set of awards</span></a> this week.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Our Office of Research asked for proposals across all disciplines, and that’s what we have in projects like “Novel Bisaminoquinoline Derived Self-Delivered Nanodrug Against SARS-CoV-2,” by Yuanpei Li, associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; and “‘Immunity Passport’: New Forms of Biological Citizenship Post-COVID-19,” by Cristiana Giordano, associate professor in the Department of Anthropology.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>This week, our Center for Healthcare Policy and Research, in collaboration with the Center for Health and Technology and the Behavioral Health Center of Excellence, called for proposals related to COVID-19’s impact on health services, access, outcomes and costs.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Yesterday, Distinguished Professor Walter Leal brought together a panel of UC Davis experts and others for a public awareness symposium that drew a capacity audience of 500 on Zoom, with participants from around the world — not counting hundreds more who could not get in. The symposium had 647 real-time viewers on YouTube — and the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CWPMRsxWmY&amp;feature=youtu.be"><span>recording</span></a> now has more 1,600 views. Thank you, Professor Leal and panelists. (Look for a report in Tuesday’s Dateline UC Davis.)</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Essential care</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>In Sacramento, UC Davis Health continues to do brilliant work in testing and research, and, of course, treatment. Here’s a wonderful story about the <a href="https://health.ucdavis.edu/health-news/newsroom/festive-farewell-for-uc-davis-patient-successfully-treated-for-covid-19/2020/04"><span>festive farewell</span></a> our health care team gave to a patient as she left the hospital. Beyond COVID-19, our health care team is continuing to provide essential patient care, including cancer surgeries, organ transplants and supporting the region’s trauma care needs — truly extraordinary in light of all that is happening. We thank our health care heroes. (The Washington Post spent a whole day here last week, and you can see a <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/video/national/what-its-like-to-have-cancer-surgery-during-a-pandemic/2020/04/23/7fb077c8-f6f4-4b1c-9619-7f305155dd89_video.html"><span>video report</span></a> here, if you’re a subscriber.)</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Departments and students have been helping where they can, donating personal protective equipment and making face shields, for example, delivering hundreds of them this week and last to our medical center.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The <a href="https://hr.ucdavis.edu/departments/asap/resources/ucd-covid-19"><span>Academic and Staff Assistance Program</span></a>, or ASAP, which provides high quality, confidential counseling for faculty and staff at UC Davis and UC Davis Health, is offering its services virtually, and holding presentations and discussions on a number of topics, as well as drop-in support groups. For more information, call Davis ASAP, 530-752-2727, or UC Davis Health ASAP, 916-734-2727.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>We have a truly outstanding team on both of our campuses and beyond, a point recognized earlier this week in a “Twitter Roadblock” — when our coaches joined their counterparts around the country in tweeting their support for their academic and health colleagues “as they take the fight to COVID-19 in our labs and hospitals.” They used the hashtag <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ProudToBeOnTheirTeam?src=hashtag_click"><span>#ProudToBeOnTheirTeam</span></a> — and if you look it up, you’ll see the tweets from this amazing show of support.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Face coverings</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>This morning, <a href="https://www.yolocounty.org/Home/Components/News/News/11623/26"><span>Yolo County issued an order requiring people to wear face coverings outside the home, including at work</span></a>. Our groundskeepers, first-responders and health care workers have already been wearing masks and face coverings at work. If you are required to be on campus to work, please bring your own face covering to wear. Most of you will already have them for your essential trips out of the house.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>For employees who do not have suitable face coverings available for their on-campus assignments, we will have details soon about how to request them. As you might expect, orders for face coverings, including nonmedical masks, are in high demand. We have a limited supply on hand and have placed additional orders for expected delivery in June.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The county order is effective immediately but not enforceable until 8 a.m. Monday, April 27. <strong>Please remember:</strong> Although wearing a face covering is one tool for reducing the spread of the virus, doing so is not a substitute for sheltering in place, physical distancing of at least 6 feet, and frequent hand-washing.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Planning scenarios</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>I told you last week about two Scenario Planning Groups that we’ve established to prepare the campus for a resumption of activities, subject, of course, to evolving conditions and medical guidance as well as county, state and federal directives. Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph Hexter leads one of these groups, focusing on instruction for the fall quarter; while Vice Chancellor Kelly Ratliff of Finance, Operations and Administration leads the other, focusing on operations.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>These groups will coordinate with the Office of Research, which has posted <a href="https://research.ucdavis.edu/guidelines-for-uc-davis-research-ramp-up-ramp-down-april-23-2020"><span>guidelines for ramping up research</span></a> — but please note, and this is important: We are not there yet. This is preparation. We remain in Phase 1, sheltering in place in adherence to government directives, with only critical research allowed. Phase 2 allows time-sensitive research activities (with only a third of research personnel allowed on-site at any time). Phase 3 provides for a gradual restart, with two-thirds of research personnel allowed on-site at any time. In Phase 4, we would return to full research operations. (The guidelines can also be used in reverse, to ramp down research.)</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The guidance includes principles that must be followed. They include the following: Protect the mental and physical health and safety of the research work force, clinical patients and human research subjects; no researcher should feel they are being compelled to work on campus or in the field during periods of shelter-at-home directives; safe practices within laboratories must be rigorously maintained, with adequate access to PPE and other safety related supplies; and the number of people in a workspace must be limited, to allow for proper social distancing.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Federal aid</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>You may have heard that the federal government’s $2 trillion CARES Act provided direct funding to lessen the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on students and institutions of higher education. UC Davis expects to receive almost $34 million. Half, almost $17 million, will be used to provide direct financial support to students for increased needs related to the coronavirus. Financial Aid professionals at UC Davis and across UC are developing plans to distribute these funds to students, with the vast majority of funds expected to be awarded this quarter.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The remaining $17 million will be used to address the operational impact of COVID-19 on the campus. This level of funding, while helpful, will meet only a small portion of the campus need: Last month alone, we experienced unanticipated expenditures and losses of $80 million.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Campus leaders are developing guiding principles for allocation of our CARES Act funds. The U.S. Department of Education is expected to issue additional guidance and rules about the acceptable use and timeline for these funds, which will impact campus decisions.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>We did some fundraising of our own last weekend during our fourth annual Give Day. We were a bit wary of going forward with this event during the pandemic, but ultimately decided our needs are too great — especially our emergency funds, new and old, that are providing COVID-19 relief to our students and front-line workers. <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/record-give-day-total-unprecedented-time"><span>Not only did people respond, but they did so in a record way — contributing more than $2.5 million</span></a> to funds and programs all across the university, including $200,000 for those emergency funds I mentioned.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Earth Day and beyond</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Before this pandemic, our Office of Sustainability had organized more than a month of activities to celebrate the 50th Earth Day. I want to thank everyone who pivoted quickly to move as many of those events online as possible. The calendar on our<a href="http://earthday.ucdavis.edu/"><span>Earth Day website</span></a> includes a World Climate Simulation next week (a program that can complement student learning in classes addressing climate change) and a<a href="https://crc.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/"><span>virtual tour of our California Raptor Center on May 2</span></a>.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Another Earth Day project is 50/50/50, in which we are all invited to submit essays, poems, artworks, posters, short films and music reflecting our thoughts about Earth Day when it began 50 years ago (those of us who are old enough to remember); our feelings today, on the 50th anniversary; and our vision for 50 years hence. Submit by email to <a href="mailto:sustainability@ucdavis.edu"><span>sustainability@ucdavis.edu</span></a>, and the team will assemble everything in a gallery on the Earth Day website.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>I am heartened at a time like this to know we are in this together, taking care of one another and our planet (including the <a href="https://health.ucdavis.edu/health-news/newsroom/season-2-of-keeping-up-with-the-peregrines-nest-flicks-and-chill/2020/04"><span>peregrine falcons who are the stars of a webcam show</span></a> from their nest atop the UC Davis Medical Center — be sure to check it out!).</span></span></span></span></span></p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 56.25%"><iframe width="480" height="270" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JVC1RHDcw7A?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p><strong><span><span><span>Sincerely,<br /> Gary S. May</span></span></span></strong><br /><span><span><span><em>Chancellor</em></span></span></span></p> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages" hreflang="en">Messages and Announcements</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/news/messages/chancellor-messages" hreflang="en">Chancellor’s Messages</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/chancellor-videos" hreflang="en">Chancellor&#039;s Videos</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 24 Apr 2020 22:04:47 +0000 Gary S. May 2471 at https://leadership.ucdavis.edu